Gardening and Other Metaphors

Something I was hoping to do last summer (but never got around to and didn’t really know how to) was have a few vegetables growing. Vegetables that I could call my own. Something to grow and nurture and mature and feel proud of.

Well, that was last year.

This year I still held hope but was no more motivated to act. But then the opportunity presented itself for a 14×6 plot near-ish my home… for free. All I have to do is plant it and tend it, nurture, mature, and feel proud of it.

So I figured I should take the opportunity while it was there.

It’s a community garden, which is really handy for those who don’t have the space and/or opportunity to garden at home. And I think the whole “community garden thing” is really catching on. For me this arrangement is wonderful for a few reasons.

  1. I don’t have a yard and/or garden in my condo
  2. I don’t have the time or desire to tend more than a small plot
  3. I’ve been interested in connecting closer in my community and this is one way to do that
  4. I want to learn more about growing vegetables and about the world I live in
  5. I don’t know how to garden, not really. And I don’t know if I would like one in the future. This is a good way for me to find out. A trial period if you will. To see if it sticks

So, yes, I’m doing something trendy but I’m also doing something educational, “green” (which I suppose you could say is also trendy), sustainable, and cost-effective. Oh, and I’ll be sure to be eating healthier if all goes according to plan. Like, if the stuff actually grows.

While we were planting the plot I couldn’t help but look around at the other plots and the other gardeners in our garden. Most of them are couples, and many are seasoned gardeners. Or at least somewhat experienced.

I also couldn’t help but notice the confident way they were all preparing and planting their areas. And the cool tools they brought with them. And pre-grown plants. And, well, gardening stuff. It was all a bit intimidating.

H and I, well, we brought a few seeds, some tomato seedlings from my mom, some old potatoes in the cupboard that were starting to spud… and a spoon.

Our plan was (and still is) to throw the stuff into the ground, give it some water, and see how it grows.

There’s probably a metaphor in there somewhere—actually probably several—for my marriage but I’m not going to think too deeply on it.