About Robyn Roste

My name is Robyn Roste and I'm a freelance writer in Abbotsford, BC. I help purpose-driven businesses translate their heart message into words so they can create meaningful connections with their customers.

Get More Clients Fast With These 7 Ideas

How do you get more clients fast? This is the ultimate question and when you’re in this position, you don’t have time to try things that “might” work. You need it to work. Now.

get more clients fast

Let’s dive right in: ideas to get more clients fast

Get more clients fast with these seven ideas. I can’t guarantee they’ll work, but they’ve worked for me so at least it’s a starting point.

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1. Reach out to your long-lost clients

This tip only works if you’ve had clients before, but assuming you have this is an excellent place to start. If you haven’t worked with a client for a couple months you can classify them as “cold” and they qualify for this tactic. Go through your cold clients and send them an email asking how their project/magazine/website/etc. is going and if there’s anything you can help them with.

If you had positive experiences with clients in the past and they didn’t call you back for more, it may not be because they don’t like you or don’t have work. Sometimes they’re too busy to reach out…sometimes they don’t think of you…and sometimes they have a project but haven’t got to letting you know about it yet.

Do it!

Extra reading: Overcome the Fear of Marketing Yourself

2. Ask for referrals

Sometimes this can feel awkward but when you need clients it’s time to get over it and as for referrals. Ask your current clients if they have any colleagues who could use your services. Tell them you’re looking to add a few more clients to your roster. Either they’ll tell you they don’t know anyone, they’ll give you a couple leads or they’ll give you more work themselves. THIS WORKS!

Extra Reading: Want to Work from Home? Consider Freelance Writing!

3. Tell your network you’re open for business

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, the best way to let people know you’re available is by saying you’re available. Mine your friends and family list for leads. Remember, you NEED clients NOW. You’re in a spot. Lay it out in an interesting, polite way so it’s easy for them to think of you when they hear about someone looking for a writer.

4. Run an ad

I have a friend who does this and swears by it. Whenever she’s looking for a couple more clients she runs a Facebook ad for a week or two to a super-duper targeted audience and gets her money back tenfold. You have to know what you’re doing, and target the right audience, but this can and does work.

If you do want to run ads as part of your prospecting strategy, make sure your pricing includes that overhead!

For extra help on the subject, I co-created the course How to Price Your Work. Setting your prices takes a bit of effort and guts but it will help you stay away from jobs that don’t pay enough. So you can make a living from your craft!

5. Apply to job board postings

Yes there are horror stories from job boards. Yes I would say you don’t get the strongest clients from job boards. However, you’re in a situation where you need clients now and job boards are filled with businesses looking for people just like you. You’ll have to look hard and put out a lot of inquiries but you’ll find clients.

Here are a few suggestions for job boards I’ve found good.

Extra reading: How to Find Great Freelance Writing Jobs

This next one is going to blow your mind.

6. Do a Twitter search

Using a Twitter search (or browse my helpful Twitter list for Writing Jobs) you’ll find real-time tweets from businesses looking for writers. Here are a few hashtag searches you can try.

  • #writerwanted
  • #ghostwriter
  • #hiring #writer
  • #writingcommunity
  • #journalismjobs
  • #writingjobs
  • #remotejobs
  • #freelancejobs

I’ve connected with quite a few awesome clients through Twitter so I’m a fan of this one to say the least!

Extra reading: Get Noticed by Influencers on Twitter Using Lists

7. Write guest posts

I should qualify this with write paid guest posts. Writing free ones is a good long-term strategy but doesn’t work when you need clients now. Different goals.

There are lots of websites and blogs that pay for content although there’s no set rate. But if you need cash flow…this is one way to get ‘er done. You’ll have to do the pitching so get ready to hustle.

Extra reading: Content Marketing Ideas to Keep Your Prospect Funnel Full

So? Did you get some great new ideas to get clients fast?

These are emergency strategies for when you’re in panic mode and need clients quick. Even people with the best referral programs and ongoing marketing strategies run into this from time-to-time (but…not as much).

While these are all effective I encourage you not to try them all at once. You will burn out! Too much hustle is unsustainable. Plus you’ll be hustling so much you may not find time to do the work!


Get more clients fast with these seven ideas. I can't guarantee they'll work, but they've worked for me so at least it's a starting point.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

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Get more clients fast with these seven ideas. I can't guarantee they'll work, but they've worked for me so at least it's a starting point.
How do you get more clients fast? This is the ultimate question and when you're in this position, you don't have time to try things that "might" work. You need it to work. Now.

How to Help Your Team Become Better Writers

As writers, we take responsibility for continually improving our craft. But what about other people? Do we have a responsibility to help them become better writers?

How to Help Your Team Become Better Writers (Three Ideas)

It depends.

Anyone can learn writing, it’s a skilll and with enough training and practice, most people can get by. But the majority of non-writers it would seem take this skill for granted. They assume since everyone can do it, it’s not a big deal.

And here’s where they’re so, so wrong. Iiin fact, there are terrifying studies looking into the decline of writing skills that indicate this could become a serious issue in the workplace if the downward trend continues.

Great for freelance writers though. Just saying.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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How to help your team become better writers

Anyway, today we’re talking about helping our non-writing teammates become better writers. Why would we invest like this? There are a few reasons.

For example, if you collaborate with a graphic designer it’s super helpful if they know and understand writing and have the skills to empower you to do your best work. They’ll help identify opportunities to tweak and improve your copy and point out typos.

Another example is if you work with a customer service team that doesn’t appreciate the importance of writing, then good luck trying to convince them to use scripts or stay on message! They won’t see the point and would prefer to wing it…which definitely can go sideways. All of a sudden a healthy regard for writing is looking pretty important!

But let’s say you work on a team that respects your skills and expertise and wants to learn from you. Here are a few suggestions to help them improve in their writing.

Review the latest best practices

Writing and language evolves. The rules shift. Let’s collectively let go of the old ways and move into the new with precision and grace. But wait, how can your workplace follow writing best practices unless they have a style guide from whence to grow and change?

First things first, get a style guide to follow, then keep it updated. And work on other high-level documents that take forever but are worth their weight in gold: communications strategy, communications plan, marketing strategy, marketing plan, digital strategy, etc. etc. Through this process you’ll settle on your organization’s style, tone, audience and MORE.

By the way, once you have all this in place now you’re ready to bring in the best SEO company to review your web presence and create recommendations and strategies to help you bring everything to the next level. While SEO involves lots of back-end, technical work, there is also a ton of writing opportunity so don’t shy away from SEO!

Offer professional training 

There are many ways to help your team become better writers and professional training is a wonderful short cut. Whether you invest in online courses or sending team members to workshops or conferences, learning from another professional can be a great way to upskill without going back to school for an entire degree.

For team building you could even bring in a speaker and spend the day learning together. These sorts of experiences can be fun compared to other types of training, depending on your team’s availability, interest and personalities of course!

Implement tools to become better writers

There are SO many helpful writing tools you can use to help your team (and yourself) become better writers. You don’t need to memorize all the rules! Explore some of the latest online writing tools and see how they could benefit your team.

When it comes to business, words matter. First impressions last. And if the way potential customers notice you is because of poor writing, this could linger in their minds like a bad smell.

Helping non-writers become better writers may seem counter-intuitive but if they’re your co-workers, it will help your business and it will help you. If you can get them to a level where they can be trusted to use language well that takes some pressure off of you so you can focus on doing what you do best.

Helping non-writers become better writers may seem counter-intuitive but if they're your co-workers, it will help your business and it will help you. If you can get them to a level where they can be trusted to use language well that takes some pressure off of you so you can focus on doing what you do best.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

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Tech Resources for Podcasting and Audio Recording

Want to start a radio show but feel limited/overwhelmed by the tech resources for podcasting and audio recording? I feel you.

But here’s the thing, it’s SO accessible these days if you want to do it, then do it.

Tech Resources for Podcasting and Audio Recording

Tech resources for podcasting

One interesting benefit of shelter-in-place realities is people are launching their dream audio projects and podcasts! And if you know me at all, you know I’m a fan of any and all audio projects.

Radio dramas. Podcasts. Documentaries. News. Farm Reports. Whatever.

And as part of my day job for the past, oh decade or so I’ve planned, edited, produced, distributed, etc. A daily 30-minute program to radio stations and web streaming outlets across Canada and in several States.

Cool, right?

And as part of my freelancing business I write radio and podcast scripts, as well as help people plan, launch and edit podcasts.

Great, right?

Living the dream 🙂

By the way, I’ve written an ebook on how to plan a podcast. It’s available from Gumroad as an Epub, Mobi or PDF for $7.99. It’s called Plan Your Podcast Playbook. Thank you for your support!

Anyway, I wanted to list the tech resources I use every day to give you an idea of how little you really need to produce your audio project.

Of course, the deeper you go the more you’ll want…and the more expensive it gets. But to get started? Easy.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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Tech resources for podcasting and audio recording

While the scope of tools and resources for recording, editing and producing a podcast are literally limitless, the list below are some of the tools I use or recommend to most people who have little to no professional audio experience.

There are a lot of shiny (and expensive) things out there. I hope this roundup helps you stave off overwhelm and focus on the big picture…your podcast.

Microphone

In the audio world, sound is of the upmost importance. But you don’t have to break the bank to have decent audio.

Here are a few suggestions for getting started but the best advice I can offer is try a few out and see what you like. In the end it does come down to personal preference.

Beginner—Blue Snowball

  • Custom condenser capsule offers crystal clear audio for Skype, Messages and FaceTime
  • Record vocals, create podcasts, and add narration to your home movies
  • Add crystal clear audio to recordings for YouTube. Frequency Response: 40 –18 kHz
  • Easy plug and play directly to your Mac or PC-no drivers to install
  • Snowball iCE is a USB 2.0 device (USB 3.0 compatible as per USB 3.0 backward compatibility specification).Sample/word Rate: 44.1 kHz/16 bit

Intermediate—Blue Yeti

  • Tri-capsule array – 3 condenser capsules can record almost any situation.
  • Multiple pattern selection – cardioid, bidirectional, omnidirectional & stereo. Frequency Response- 20Hz – 20kHz
  • Gain control, mute button, and zero-latency headphone output. Power output (RMS): 130mW
  • Perfect for vocals, musical instruments, podcasting, voiceovers, interviews, field recordings, conference calls.
  • Compatible with Windows 10, Windows 8 (including 8.1), Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP (Home and Professional), and Mac OS X (10.4.11 or higher), and requires a minimum of 64 MB of RAM(remove existing and upload).

Advanced—Shure SM7B Cardioid Dynamic Microphone

  • Flat, wide-range frequency response for exceptionally clean and natural reproduction of both music and speech
  • Bass rolloff and mid-range emphasis (presence boost) controls with graphic display of response setting
  • Improved rejection of electromagnetic hum, optimized for shielding against broadband interference emitted by computer monitors
  • Internal “air suspension” shock isolation virtually eliminates mechanical noise transmission
  • Highly effective pop filter eliminates need for any add-on protection against explosive breath sounds, even for close-up vocals or narration
  • Now shipping with the A7WS detachable windscreen, designed to reduce plosive sounds and gives a warmer tone for close-talk vocals
  • Yoke mounting with captive stand nut for easy mounting and dismounting provides precise control of microphone position

Note: With the Shure, you will need a few extra audio products, linked below. The Blue mics are USB plug-and-play so better for beginners.

9 Steps to Planning a Podcast worksheet free download

Do you want to launch a podcast?

I’ve created worksheets to help you plan a podcast…before you launch. This is a free resource but it’s part of my resource library and you’ll need a password. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the “miscellaneous” section and download the “How to Plan a Podcast Worksheet.”

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Audio editing software

Once you’ve recorded, now it’s time to edit. Sure, you can move ahead with a straight read but…I think you can do better.

Even if it’s basic enhancements like dampening background noise, cutting out mistakes or adding some intro/outro music (or…an ad?) there should be at least a bit of editing.

At the beginning, you’ll find free programs like Audacity or Garage Band will be enough but after a while you’ll want more control. That’s where next-level toys come in. I use Audition myself, but I’m in the spoken word world so I don’t need the fancy shmancy next-level stuff Pro Tools offer. But the music producers I know SWEAR by it.

Beginner—Audacity

  • Record Live Audio
  • Convert tapes and records into digital recordings or CDs
  • Edit Ogg Vorbis, MP3, WAV or AIFF sound files
  • Cut, copy, splice or mix sounds together
  • Change the speed or pitch of a recording

Intermediate—Adobe Audition

  • Improved playback and recording performance
  • DeReverb and DeNoise effects
  • Improved multitrack UI
  • On-clip gain control and waveform scaling
  • Add tracks and delete empty tracks

Advanced—Pro Tools

  • Avid Pro Tools redefined the music, film, and TV industry, providing everything you need to compose, record, edit, and mix music and audio
  • Create without bounds and work at the speed of your creativity, so you can take on the most demanding sessions and deliver the best sounding mixes possible
  • Avid Pro Tools 12 sets the stage for Avid Cloud Collaboration, the upcoming Avid Marketplace, and flexible options, so you can access the industry standard in more affordable ways than ever
Tech Resources for Podcasting

Tech resources for podcasting: podcast hosting

While you can host audio files on our own server…it’s better to invest in a podcast host. Audio files are huge and they take a lot of space and speed to manage.

There are many great options so while I’ve listed a couple below, you really can take your pick. These are podcast hosts I’ve worked with and recommend.

But do your research, see which host you resonate with and have fun!

SoundCloud—you can start publishing for free and manually submit your podcast to different platforms. While this is more popular with musicians than podcasters, this is a great little host and easy to use!

  • Real-time stats
  • Find your community
  • Connect directly with fans

Libsyn—as far as podcast hosts go, this is a classic choice. Libsyn allows you to publish once and push your episodes out to many, many outlets including Spotify, YouTube and even LinkedIn!

  • Publish your podcast everywhere
  • Podcast monetization options
  • Play and podcast pages
  • Detailed audience stats
  • Custom smartphone apps

OK so these aren’t all the tech resources for podcasting you need but a good mic, an editing program and a podcast host WILL get you started.

I mean, you’ll need a computer to record and edit on…I hope that’s clear and I’m not keeping that part a secret.

So you’ll need a good mic, an editing program, a podcast host AND a computer. Then, you’re ready to go. Everything else is details.

Want More about Podcasting?

Want to start a radio show but feel limited/overwhelmed by the tech resources for podcasting and audio recording? I feel you. But here's the thing, it's SO accessible these days if you want to do it, then do it.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
Want to start a radio show but feel limited/overwhelmed by the tech resources for podcasting and audio recording? I feel you. But here's the thing, it's SO accessible these days if you want to do it, then do it.

How to Create a Social Media Portfolio

Portfolios. In general I understand them—a collection of your work assembled to demonstrate your experience and expertise in an area.

How to Create a Social Media Portfolio

But I’ve struggled with social media and figuring out how to create a social media portfolio.

Because although it’s my work it’s not for me.

Most of my social media experience is creating content and strategies for other people or brands. It’s like ghostwriting. It’s ghostsocialing. (I sure hope that’s a hashtag.)

My mission is to figure out how to present my social media portfolio in a way that demonstrates my experience and expertise but doesn’t break client confidentiality.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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How to create a social media portfolio

As I searched the Internet I didn’t find a lot. Most how-to create a portfolio advice is for writing clips, marketing, or how to display your personal social media stats.

All of this is good and useful, but off topic. And I guess I shouldn’t be surprised because it’s a tricky balance.

So I started asking writing friends how they add ghostwriting credits to their portfolio. Short answer, they don’t. They leave it out and just refer to “ghostwriting services” or “x amount of books/blogs ghostwritten for x amount of clients.”

Vague but what else can you do?

But I want to do more for my social media portfolio

The golden rule when you create a social media portfolio:

Show don’t tell

You know you need to do it in your writing but it also is important in your portfolios. But how do you show (or even create a social media portfolio) when your clients don’t love the idea of admitting they don’t run their own accounts?

Or what if you did strategy work with a client, how do you display that?

And what if you worked with a client at one point and their feed looked amazing but now they manage their own and it isn’t so awesome?

How do you show that?

Here are my best ideas for building an awesome social media portfolio

Create a social media portfolio by starting with your services and expertise.

First, showcase the services you offer

The best social media portfolio’s I’ve seen break the services down into bite-sized pieces.

Here are a few tips for creating this section of your social media portfolio.

  • Images are your friend. Find generic stock images representing the services you offer and the types of clients you serve
  • Highlight the services you offer
  • Make it interesting

You can expand on and explain the services you offer, or not. It depends on your target client and what will speak to him/her.

Second, list your clients

Gulp.

I know, we’ve been talking about the situation where you can’t name your clients or you aren’t sure how to talk about them. We’ll just do our best here.

Remember how you listed your services a few minutes ago? These are now our categories for organizing our clients.

So, in my case it’s Consulting, Social Media, Blogging and Platform Strategy.

Divide your clients into categories (they can be in more than one) and make them look pretty.

If you can’t name your client then describe them.

You can list them as a Wellness Company in Vancouver, BC for example.

If you can’t show their logo or brand then find a nice stock image that represents the type of business they are. Now list how you worked with them according to your categories.

Bing, bang, boom.

When you create a social media portfolio you can't always showcase your clients. If you can't, find an image representing their brand/business and describe how you served them.

Here are a few tips for creating this section of your social media portfolio.

  • Describe the types of clients you’ve worked with and the types of services you provided
  • Include links to client websites if you can
  • Include client testimonials where you can

In my mock-up example I haven’t expanded to this point but you can see how more is more here.

However, if you can’t say more due to client confidentiality then a beautiful image and a short description of the work you did will suffice.

Update: Here’s how I’m working around this in 2020

Third, make sure your personal social media profiles are optimized

I’m listing this third but your social media profiles are the first and best part of your social media portfolio.

You don’t need them optimized to create a social media portfolio, but this is where many of your future clients will find you for the first time.

You want to make a positive, memorable impression here.

Wherever they find you.

In a previous training I outlined how to optimize your social media profiles but here are the highlights.

  • Choose a professional/standout profile picture and cover photo
  • Make it easy for people to know who you are/what you do
  • Link to your website
  • Include keywords about your services
  • Be clear on your location/contact info

A few other things to consider when you create a social media portfolio

  • Think about what you want to be hired for. Is it social media management? What about content creation, content curation, platform development, strategy, etc. Curate your portfolio to display that—you don’t need to list EVERY client or every freelance job you’ve ever performed (I mean, you can, but put some thought into it)
  • Things to cover: who you are (about), your mission, what you do, and who you serve (aka who you want to work with)
  • Is there an area you’d like more work in? Highlight this throughout your services, experience, expertise, and even which clients you mention

While I’m still building my social media portfolio, here’s what I’m doing with my writing portfolio on social media.

After I wrote this post, Thema asked this question about social media portfolios

Hi Robyn! I ran across your article about social media portfolios. I am pursuing a career as a Public Relations Specialist but only have the social media pages I curated for my internship to show. Any suggestions on how to create a portfolio with very few work examples?

This is such a great question and while I have answered Thema’s email I also want to provide my general tips here in case it’s helpful.

What if I have very few work examples?

Question: How do I create a portfolio with very few work examples?

Answer: Depending on what type of job you’re going after this answer changes but I can tell you in general what I would do.


First, make sure the curated items you have for your portfolio are presented in a compelling way

As in, make sure they look great and are easy to skim and demonstrate the scope of your skillset.

Perhaps you don’t have traditional clips right now because you’re just getting started. Think about what you CAN present to demonstrate your skills and abilities.

For example, if you’re looking to run a client’s Instagram account, then what are some things you can showcase on your Instagram account to demonstrate your proficiency? 

Do you have a good amount of followers? Then highlight that.

Do you have a posting strategy that generates leads? Unpack that.

Have any of your posts gone viral? Take some screenshots and write a case study on what you did and what happened.

Speaking of case studies, this is another excellent way to showcase your social media portfolio.

Even if you have many examples, breaking some key campaigns into case studies is a great way to showcase your results, your strategic knowledge and your competence.

For more on this specific approach, read How to Write a Case Study.

How to Write a Case Study free ebook

I’ve also turned this case study training into a free ebook, which you can download in my resource library.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re logged in, navigate to the “Writing” section and look for “How to Write a Case Study for Marketing Ebook.”

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OK, back to Thema’s question.

Second, work on adding new samples/clips as much as possible 

If you’re not able to get clients/paid work then I recommend writing blog posts (or something similar) to beef up your portfolio and showcase your knowledge.

One of the big reasons I continue updating my blog and improving these posts is because they showcase my writing and expertise to potential clients.

These days, most of the work I do is without bylines and difficult to demonstrate in a portfolio so having regular bylined blog posts is an asset.

Third, networking! Always be networking

Get to know the people who work in the industry you want to be working in. Also get to know the people who work for the types of companies you’d like to work with/for. 

When you know people then the breadth of your portfolio doesn’t matter as much.

True story. Once you’re established, see how many new clients ask for your portfolio. 

I mean, someone you have no previous connection with might want that. Or if they’re from a big agency where that is par for the course. 

But most people will either be going off of a referral from someone they trust or they’ll want one or two samples from similar projects you’ve worked on.

I hope this answers your question! Let me know if there’s anything else to add about social media portfolios.

PS if you want to see how this works in real life, here’s an example from mine. Look for the section in this post titled “Start small, focus your efforts on ‘connectors’.”

How do you create a social media portfolio in a way that demonstrates your experience and expertise but doesn't break client confidentiality? Here are my best ideas for building an awesome social media portfolio.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
How do you create a social media portfolio in a way that demonstrates your experience and expertise but doesn't break client confidentiality? Here are my best ideas for building an awesome social media portfolio.
How do you create a social media portfolio in a way that demonstrates your experience and expertise but doesn't break client confidentiality?

You may also like How to Plan a Podcast in 9 Steps

How to Find Great Freelance Writing Jobs

When you’re a new freelancer, finding freelance writing jobs may seem like an overwhelming task. And I understand how finding a gig—any gig—can feel a bit like luck.

How to Find Great Freelance Writing Jobs

Where do you even start looking? And when you find someone looking for a writer, how do you know the job is any good?

The good news and the bad news about online freelance writing jobs

OK, here it is. The good news is, when you Google “freelance writing jobs” you’ll find a lot of postings.

The bad news is, when you you’ll also find a lot of low-paying postings and straight up bad gigs.

Learning to tell the difference is an important part about finding success as a freelance writer.

Finding gigs that pay what you need is another important part.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
Click the image for more information, or pop your email address in the form below

How to discern a good freelance writing job from a bad one

The first thing to keep in mind is “good” and “bad” gigs are subjective. You need to know ahead of time what kind of job you’re looking for and what type of client will suit your needs.

If you’re new to the freelance world you may not know this yet and will learn through trial and error. That’s OK! But take a few minutes to think about the types of freelance writing jobs you’d like to have.

  • Writing blog posts and articles?
  • Media releases?
  • Business profiles?
  • Journalism?

Think it through and write it down

After you know what type of writing you want to do take a few minutes to figure out who your ideal client is.

  • Are you looking for someone who is hands off?
  • Someone to collaborate with?
  • Do you want to be able to meet in person?
  • Do you want one-off clients or ones you have an ongoing relationship with?

There are no wrong answers here, just what’s right for you. Knowing what types of clients you’d like will help you avoid overwhelm as you comb through the vast array of freelance writing jobs out there.

It will also keep you from applying for gigs that aren’t a good fit for you.

Extra Credit: Platform Building: Smart and Strategic Tips for Writers

Bonus tip: keep a close eye on how the job postings are written. If you see phrases like “looking for hungry writers,” or a value attributed to the quantity of articles they’re looking for rather than quality of writing, these should trigger warning bells in your head.

These gigs are often low paying (pennies per word, if that) and demanding. Even if you don’t have much experience yet, you can do better.

How to figure out what you need to earn as a freelance writer

Even though many writers aren’t numbers people, it’s important to learn how to budget so you know how much income you need in order to reach your goals.

Do a bit of number crunching and determine what you need per month to get by.

Also figure out how much time you have to dedicate to your freelancing. From here you’ll have a good idea of how many clients you can take on and how much you need from each one.


If you’re wondering how to set your prices, I think you’ll like the course I co-created, How to Price Your Work. Setting your prices takes a bit of effort and guts but it will help you stay away from jobs that don’t pay enough. So you can make a living from your craft!

When you look at online postings you may feel like you have to lower your prices or standards in order to get work.

Don’t give up!

There are great freelance writing jobs out there but sometimes you have to know where to look.

Where I look for great freelance writing jobs

I encourage writers to think outside of the box when looking for work. Even when you need to get clients fast you shouldn’t lower your standards.

The main ways I find work are from referrals, networking with other writers and Twitter (really!).

There’s always someone looking for a writer but people have to know you’re a writer in order for them to think of you and reach out.

Job boards are a great starting point for freelancers who don’t have established networks. The good gigs are scooped up quick so if this is your go-to then you will need to check often and apply a lot.

It’s a numbers game so don’t become discouraged if you don’t hear back from many or most of the places you pitch.

Here are a few suggestions for job boards I’ve found good.

Parting words: I’ve learned it’s important to keep looking for freelance work even if you have a full client load. Developing strategies to keep the marketing machine going during busy times ensures you won’t have so many dry spells. And the better your clients are, the less you’ll need in order to reach your financial goals.


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When you're a new freelancer, finding freelance writing jobs may seem like an overwhelming task. And I understand how finding a gig—any gig—can feel a bit like luck. Where do you even start looking? And when you find someone looking for a writer, how do you know the job is any good?

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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When you're a new freelancer, finding freelance writing jobs may seem like an overwhelming task. And I understand how finding a gig—any gig—can feel a bit like luck. Where do you even start looking? And when you find someone looking for a writer, how do you know the job is any good?
When you are a new freelancer, finding freelance writing jobs may seem like an overwhelming task. And I get how finding a gig can feel a bit like luck.