Facebook Group Tips | Avoiding the Drama

These Facebook Group tips will help you network without going down the drama rabbit hole. Why would you want to participate in groups? They’re an interesting ecosystem within the social media behemoth. For example, many successful Facebook Groups provide small, safe spaces for likeminded individuals to connect. And many groups have the added benefit of being secret or private, so your group activities aren’t revealed to your friends or followers.

Facebook Group Tips | Avoiding the Drama

Facebook Group Tips

Networking is a critical aspect of success in the freelance writing world. Because many writers are also introverts, the idea of networking can seem either overwhelming or needless. But those who have joined healthy writing groups, they understand the power of networking and collaborating with likeminded people. In this, you discover your tribe and realize you’re not so alone afterall.

See also: Networking Tips for Introverted Writers

While in-person groups can be amazing, the isolated nature of the writing life doesn’t always support regular attendance. That’s where online networking come in. With more than a billion active users, Facebook is an easy place to find community and networking opportunities. But if you’ve joined groups before, you may understand their potential volitility. These Facebook Groups tips are intended to help freelance writers make the most out of networking while avoiding the drama.

Groups versus Pages

Before we get into the Facebook Group tips let’s do a quick overview of the difference between groups and pages. If you have a business people assume you have a Facebook Page. This is a convenience for the general public and can function, in its simplest form, as a business card directing prospects to your website or informing them of how to contact you. Page owners can leverage their pages and use them like a community but this takes a lot of effort and dedication, which is why groups may be a better option for interacting with your followers and fans. Having a Facebook Page is also required if you want to run Facebook ads, which is something to consider if you’re ready to invest in online prospecting. But we’ll get to that another time.

A Facebook Group is less linear than a page and the group members can have the ability to create content and carry on discussions without the administrator’s approval. Author Kirsten Oliphant describes groups as “a web, where connections don’t have to move in a linear way from the creator at the center.” Groups can be about anything (a person, a topic, a website, whatever) and, for many, are an important connection hub for a writer’s networking efforts.

Facebook Groups tips for survival

While a Facebook Page’s success is tied to the number of likes and reach, a Facebook Group can be considered successful even if it’s small. A group’s engagement and activity is what matters. For some freelancers, creating and moderating a Facebook group make sense but for many others, joining groups is enough.

We’re focusing on how to behave in other people’s groups today since that’s where the majority of freelance writers exist. So here we go.

When joining other people’s groups, here are a few things to keep in mind

  • Remember, this isn’t your group so don’t act like it is (if you don’t like it, create your own)
  • Pay attention to the group’s rules and abide by them. If the group rules say don’t share anything from them group then really don’t share anything. If the rules say don’t promote yourself then really don’t drop links and brag your bylines. Respect the group rules
  • Be kind, genuine and helpful—listen before you speak, if you have a negative emotional reaction to a topic or post don’t respond right away (avoid becoming an Internet troll!)
  • Make connections, yes. But don’t immediately try and sell something (that’s not how this works). Make sure you’re in these groups for the right reasons or this won’t be a positive experience for you
  • Watch for ways you can contribute to the group, don’t just take. Maybe you can’t participate in every discussion but if there is a question or topic you know something about, add a tip or two

While these general Facebook Group tips will keep you in good standing my biggest tip is this. Try and add value to the group rather than dissension. There are so many times I see a beautiful group get sidelined by a disagreement where the moderator doesn’t step in soon enough and the discussion gets out of hand. When groups go down this route it stops being safe and people become afraid to voice their opinion, lest they get trolled or jumped on.

If you see this happening in one of your groups there are a few things you can do.

  • Avoid the drama. Consider muting the thread or group for a few days until the storm blows over
  • There is a chance the group moderator hasn’t seen the drama unfolding so if you think this is the case tag the person in the thread to draw their attention to it
  • Maybe the group is heading down this new, more volitile direction. If it stops feeling like a safe space to you or you feel like it’s just attracting distracting, unhealthy drama then consider leaving the group
  • As much as you can, avoid joining in the debate. In my experience, good doesn’t seem to come from emotional social media back-and-forths

For those looking for community, Facebook Groups can be an excellent option.

When searching for new groups to join, ask your friends and colleagues what groups they recommend first. If you do a general search, keep in mind private groups will more often be safer than public groups. This is because anyone can join a public group but you have to be approved to join a private group. Look for groups that mirror your interests, or are moderated by people you admire. And if you do join a group and it’s not a good fit, don’t feel bad leaving. Streamline your group experience and only stay in the groups you know you’ll be active in.

These Facebook Group tips will help you network without going down the drama rabbit hole. Why would you want to participate in groups? They're an interesting ecosystem within the social media behemoth. For example, many successful Facebook Groups provide small, safe spaces for likeminded individuals to connect. And many groups have the added benefit of being secret or private, so your group activities aren't revealed to your friends or followers.

One more thing. I think you’ll enjoy my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

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Health Tips for Writers

This quick list of health tips for writers is the result of an instrumental change I made, which has made a huge difference in my life and career. I reached a point in my writing life where I realized being good at writing wasn’t going to be enough to have a substantial career if I wasn’t healthy enough to sit at the computer to, you know, write all day.

Health Tips for Writers

Health tips for writers

If you’re anything like me you spend a lot of time sitting in front of your computer. And, if you’re anything like me, living this sedentary writer lifestyle can lead to some unwanted health issues like weight gain, headaches, eye pain, joint/back pain and more.

For a long time I thought I had a pretty active lifestyle—until I got a Fitbit and learned the harsh truth. I learned I didn’t move much at all and after a few months of denial (the activity tracker must not be tracking all my movement) I decided to do something about it. Because…well, the writing was on the wall. I had gained weight, I was tired all the time, my back and neck had chronic pain and I was overall miserable. I had a feeling I was on the fast track for something much worse health-wise.

So I decided to make some changes. This was about a year ago and I’ve seen nothing but positive results after implementing a healthier routine. And yes, by getting up at 4:30 a.m. for 21 days did in fact inspire this. I learned if I can do that, I can do anything.

Here are my top tips

Take a screen break every 60 minutes.

The Fitbit makes it easy because it buzzes every hour and reminds me to get moving.

And, I’ve learned, if I get up and move every hour—walk around, have a stretch, whatever—I am pretty productive. It makes it easy for me to push hard on my work because I know I get to take a quick break soon. It has been a great habit to pick up! Plus I hear not looking at a screen all day is good for you or something.

Get outside.

Halfway through my workday I take a walk. I used to think this was such a waste of work time but I’ve learned the exercise combined with the fresh air (and lack of screen time) acts as a reset. It renews my energy and I return to my desk full of ideas. My walks last for about 15 minutes and I find it’s an excellent length.

P-O-S-T-U-R-E.

Yes, sitting with proper posture has been something I’ve worked on as is making a big difference to my back and neck. As in, I don’t have such issues with pain. Which allows me to focus and concentrate on my work. Of course I have moments where I slip back into slouching and hunching but as soon as I realize it I adjust. And it’s working.

Snacks should be vegetables.

Ugh I know! But if you’re wondering where that sneaky 10 pounds came from take a good look at your snack cupboard. I’m making a deliberate effort to have more vegetables in my life and it’s making a difference.

Hydrate. All day, e’ry day.

I’ve loved coffee for a long time but as I changed up my nutrition habits I realized my relationship with coffee had to change. We could still see each other but I needed water to be the primary liquid in my life. Staying hydrated helps me stay focused and clear-headed. And I don’t seem to have many headaches anymore.

Have a strong morning routine.

I think this is the most important of my health tips for writers because this is where everything started for me. I get out of bed and tackle the things most important to me first, before I do anything else. This helps me set up my day for success and I’m so glad I found something that works. It helps me arrive at work with a clear head, ready to dive into the day.

Exercise first thing in the morning.

Speaking of morning routines, allow me to suggest adding exercise to it. Working out first thing isn’t easy but it makes a remarkable difference to the rest of your day. I used to try and hit the gym after work but there were so many times where other plans or meetings came up or I found convenient excuses to skip out. Adding exercise into my morning routine means it’s something I do—not something I think about doing or debate about doing.

So those are my health tips for writers. Walk around, drink lots of water, get outside, build an awesome morning routine. You know, do healthy things!

Author Joanna Penn published a book on this topic as well, so if you’re looking for a deep dive on building a healthy writing lifestyle check out The Healthy Writer: Reduce Your Pain, Improve Your Health, And Build A Writing Career For The Long Term.

If you're anything like me you spend a lot of time sitting in front of your computer. Here are some health tips for writers I hope you will find helpful.

One more thing. I think you’ll like my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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If you're anything like me you spend a lot of time sitting in front of your computer. And, if you're anything like me, living this sedentary writer lifestyle can lead to some unwanted health issues like weight gain, headaches, eye pain, joint/back pain and more. Here are some health tips for writers I hope you'll find helpful.

How to Choose a Writers Group

Before you can choose a writers group you have to have some idea of what you’re looking for and what you need. Once you know those things, here are a few ways to tell if the group is a good writers group.

How to Choose a Writers Group

How to Choose a Writers Group

When I first started considering being a freelance writer I remember thinking…now what?

I didn’t know where to start, who to talk to or how it all worked.

Of course I Googled things but without a mentor to point me in the right direction I felt overwhelmed and paralyzed.

After stumbling around for a while I met a freelance writer in person and she introduced me to a local writers group. I remember thinking…THIS is what I need! And you know what? It was.

Now that I’ve been around this world for a while I know there’s a lot of people on the Internet who advocate against writers groups.

And their reasons are fair.

  • If you get a bad group it can be a terrible waste of time and energy
  • This risk of a not-good-fit group is feeling unwelcome and competitive
  • And if you’re in a group of people who aren’t there to be helpful, it can be a disheartening and negative experience

But what if you get the right group?

Well! Now we’re talking. If you’re in a good writers group you’ll benefit from SO MANY THINGS!

Reasons to join a good writers group

  • You get out of your own head
  • There’s (instant) helpful and constructive feedback
  • You have others who believe in you and your work even when you don’t
  • You meet other writers
  • There’s a chance you’ll hone your craft
  • Motivation
  • Accountability
  • And, if you’re lucky, you may even find a mentor

OK so I’ve convinced you to join a writers group. Great. Now for the next important question: HOW. How do you choose a writers group?

How to choose a (good) writers group

Before you can choose a writers group you have to have some idea of what you’re looking for and what you need.

You should know what type of writing you do, how much commitment you can make, what type of writers group you’re looking for (there are many kinds of writers groups: critique groups, mentorship groups, professional groups, genre-defined groups, non-fiction groups, freelance groups…etc.), and how formal you want the group to be.

Once you know those things, here are a few ways to tell if the group is a good writers group.

Questions to ask

  • Does the group have a clear and defined goal?

This doesn’t have to be engraved on a plaque but it does need to exist. If a group doesn’t know why they’re meeting it’s like a book club without a book…what’s the point?

  • Does the group have the same writing interests as you?

You want to make sure your writing interests are aligned. While it’s great to know writers from all sorts of genres, a writers group should have a bit more in common. If you’re a poet, find a poets group. If you’re a freelance writer, find a freelance writers group (here’s an example from my life, proof that good writing groups exist).

  • Do the members in the writers group write more than they talk about writing?

Writers write. Keep that in mind. Yes it’s good and important to socialize with other writers but a writers group should be filled with people who are writing and it should motivate you to do the same.

  • Is the group committed to kind and constructive feedback?

This has to be a safe space. You have to feel comfortable sharing your work with likeminded people and if you encounter writers who are harsh or cruel then this isn’t the kind of group you want to be in.

There’s a difference between ripping someone to shreds and offering helpful critique. New writers are more sensitive and don’t take criticism well, even if it’s well-intended. Make sure the group remembers what it was like to be new and not used to receiving criticism.

And the most important question.

  • Do the members get along?

If the writers group has behaviour guidelines—even better! If you check out a writers group meeting and there’s bickering or snide remarks or shaming then this isn’t a good sign.

Maybe there’s a bad egg and he or she needs to be removed from the group—ask the leaders what their behaviour policy is and don’t join a group where people don’t get along.

Of course no group is perfect and there are always moments where someone steps out of line or someone’s feelings get hurt. This is a part of being human. But if overall a writers group aims to meet these points then it is probably a good group.

And I will also mention these groups aren’t always in person—there are virtual writers groups and critique groups that work better for some than in-person meetings do.

Where to find writers groups

Here are a few ideas for places to look when you’re ready to join a writers group.

Online. You can Google or search for “local writers groups” on Meetup and see what comes up.

I’ve found groups this way and met a lot of interesting people through attending random local events I found online. You can do the same type of search on social media. I’ve joined lots of writers groups on Facebook and have found a couple I’m getting a lot out of

Writing associations. I’m part of a professional writing association (PWAC) and they have chapters all over Canada. I joined my local chapter and find a lot of value from my relationships with the other professional writers in the group

People you know. I mentioned how I met a local writer and she connected me with a writers group. I was so starved for connection and direction I couldn’t wait to go. Meeting other writers was so important to my development as a writer. I don’t know where I would be if I hadn’t met such wonderful mentors

Writers conferences. Yes! Going to a writers conference is huge in itself but if you can maintain relationships with a few of the writers you meet there, even better! Join an existing group or start your own. It’s a great option.

Are you ready to join a writers group?

Sometimes it feels like a lot of effort to connect with other writers and when you’re an introverted writer (as so many of us are) it can be that much tougher. I attend writers groups to stay connected and socialized as well as offer encouragement and support to the writers who I receive encouragement and support from. If you can find a good writers group I know you’ll understand why I recommend it! Why not give it a try?

Before you can choose a writers group you have to have some idea of what you need. Here are a few ways to tell if it's a good group.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

Best Gifts for Writers | Gift Guide

There are so many great gifts for writers out there! If you have suggestions or items on your wish list please send them over and I’ll add them to the guide.

Best Gifts for Writers | Gift Guide

What do you get the writer who has everything? Or, perhaps this is more accurate: Oh no! You drew THE WRITER for your secret Santa gift exchange and you have no clue what would make a good gift! Help! What are the best gifts for writers anyway? Is there a GIFT GUIDE?

Yes, yes there is.

Best Gifts for Writers

With a bunch of sections to go through, I thought a table of contents would be handy. Click on the links below to jump to the gift category you’re most interested in.


Esty finds

OK, there is SO much amazing handmade or vintage gifts for writers on Etsy. It’s overwhelming really. The last time I checked there were 18,254 results. But don’t worry, I’ve dug up a few of my personal favourites to cut your shopping down from eons to mere minutes. You’re welcome.

Best Gifts for Writers | Etsy Finds
  • Typewriter Bangle—a personalized typewriter charm? Um…yes. Please
  • Writer’s Block…Block—I have no words, this is gift perfection
  • Handmade Wood Pen—I can just imagine holding this wooden, ballpoint twist pen in my hand and allowing the creative thoughts to flow freely!
  • Quotation Mark Earrings—aren’t these adorable? Punctuation as jewelry is always a good gift, in my humble opinion. The only thing better would be an interrobang‽
  • This is What a Badass Journalist Looks Like—you can get this phrase printed on a ceramic mug, on a T-shirt or on a coaster
  • The Writing Manifesto Print—this isn’t pictured but imagine a busy (yet calming!) inspirational poster with phrases like “You are a writer,” “caffeine and headphones,” “embrase the muse,” etc.
  • Luxury Notebook—this isn’t pictured but WOW. The black faux leather is embossed with a bronze feather and “Creative Ideas.” It would make a most excellent gift for a writer

Writer-themed coffee mugs

Writing mugs need no introduction. They’re silly, they’re funny (to writers), and they hold coffee. AKA the perfect gift.

1. I Am A Writer That Means I Live In a Crazy Fantasy World With Unrealistic Expectations Thank You For Understanding Ceramic Mug

It’s accurate, it’s pretty, it’s practical. It’s perfect.

2. There Their They’re Coffee Cup

Don’t worry, your writer will get it.

3. Please Do Not Annoy The Writer Mug

I think the multiple fonts takes the edge off the murdery stuff.

4. Novel In Progress Keep Writing Mug

Short and to the point. It gives a real “leave me alone, I’m writing” vibe.

5. Stay Up Late Writers Mug

I love the typewriter. And the meta writing about writing.

6. Writer’s Block is a Figment of Your…Uh…

I can’t think of anything to say about this mug.

Best gifts for writers. Writing mugs need no introduction. They're silly, they're funny (to writers), and they hold coffee. AKA the perfect gift.

Writer-themed pendants

Writers aren’t all about writing. They appreciate writing-themed jewelry too!

1. Outlander Sassenach Pendant Necklace

In October I attended a writing conference and it was all Outlander all the time. So I know this one’s a winner.

2. Keep Calm and Write On Pendant Necklace

A cliche, a mantra, a push to keep going.

3. Why is a raven like a writing desk? Alice in Wonderland Necklace, Lewis Carroll Quote Pendant, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Jewelry

I’m watching Through the Looking Glass as I write this…there may have been some influence.

4. Library Book Necklace, Book Pendant

So many books, so little time.

Gifts for writers. Writers don't just love craft-related items, they love writing-related jewelry too! What do you get the writer who has everything? Or, perhaps this is more accurate: Oh no! You drew THE WRITER for your secret Santa gift exchange and you have no clue what would make a good gift! Help! What are the best gifts for writers anyway? Is there a GIFT GUIDE? Why yes, yes there is.

Writing notebooks | Gifts for writers

Yes, this is super practical. But I’ve pulled some of the cooler writing notebooks from the Internet. Although everyone uses computers, many writers prefer pen and paper for staying organized. I even know writers who write their novels by hand!

1. Field Notes Kraft Ruled 3-Pack

These 48-page mini logs are masterpieces.

2. Passion Planner

I have several friends who swear by this planner.

3. Refillable Travel Journal

It’s pretty, it’s refillable, and it’s perfect for writing in.

4. Productivity Planner

Get focused, beat procrastination, write things in a pretty notebook. Win win win.


E-readers

Writers love real life books but they’re also realists. Where do they put all those books they read? Which is why you should get the writer on your list an e-reader. Here are a few options!

1. Kindle Paperwhite

2. Fire 7 Tablet with Alexa

3. Fintie Nook GlowLight Plus SlimShell Case

4. Sony PRS-600 Touch Edition Digital E-Book Reader

Gifts for writers. Writers love real life books but they're also realists. Where do they put all those books they read? Which is why you should get the writer on your list an e-reader. Here are a few options!

Craft books

Books on the craft of writing are great gifts for writers! These are a few of my favourites.

1. Writer’s Market 2020: The Most Trusted Guide to Getting Published. This is the standard gift for writers!

2. On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft

This book is incredible. The advice and writing tips took my writing to the next level. It also banished adverbs. Yay.

3. Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors & Literary Agents, 28th edition: Who They Are, What They Want, How to Win Them Over

This is similar to the Writer’s Market but can there be too much of a good thing? When it comes to writing books, I say no!

4. The Weekend Book Proposal: How to Write a Winning Proposal in 48 Hours and Sell Your Book

I’m building my book proposal right now so you can see where my head’s at. Book! Book! Write your book!


Writing T-shirts | Gifts for writers

Every writer needs a writing T-shirt. And these ones are funny. Trust me on this.

1. To Quote Hamlet

This is quite silly, but I like it! (And I think your writer will too.)

2. I Put The Lit In Literature T-Shirt

I’m not 100 per cent sure what “lit” means in today’s slang but my gut says it’s pretty cool. So this saying is probably cool too.

3. This is My Writing Shirt

A bit on the nose but accurate nonetheless.

4. Grammar Police T-Shirt

This is for those special writers or editors in your life who are proud of their grammar grasp and want the world to know they’re paying attention to misplaced modifiers and pronoun usage.


Writing prompts

Looking for writing prompts and writing journals? This is your official one-stop shop!

1. 1200 Creative Writing Prompts (Adventures in Writing)

If you’re looking for writing ideas, you’ve come to the right place.

2. 1,000 Awesome Writing Prompts

Prompt sections include beginners writing prompts, constrained writing, flash fiction, ripper prompts, and general writing prompts.

3. A Year of Creative Writing Prompts (Write On!)

Kick your imagination into gear with this collection of hand-picked, hand-crafted, explosively creative writing prompts!

4. 365 Journal Writing Ideas: A year of daily journal writing prompts, questions & actions to fill your journal with memories, self-reflection, creativity & direction

Follow the undated daily journal writing prompts and weekly actions to fill your journal to the point of bursting.

Looking for writing prompts and writing journals? This is your official one-stop shop! What do you get the writer who has everything? Or, perhaps this is more accurate: Oh no! You drew THE WRITER for your secret Santa gift exchange and you have no clue what would make a good gift! Help! What are the best gifts for writers anyway? Is there a GIFT GUIDE? Yes, yes there is.

Gifts for writers, Pin it for later!

Oh no! You drew THE WRITER for your gift exchange and you have no clue what to get. Help! What are the best gifts for writers anyway? Is there a GIFT GUIDE?

Stay tuned, more to come. I’ve got ideas for writing prompts, writing-themed jewelry, writing BOOKS, writing inspiration, and writing clothing (obviously) in the queue. And whatever else I can dig up!

Other Fun THings For Writers

Gifts for writers are fairly straightforward. Literary-themed beverage containers and office wear as well as the obvious notebooks should keep them happy.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

Five Podcasts I Love and Recommend for Freelancers

Why are podcasts so great? Well I think it has something to do with the medium. Listening to a person speak connects you in a way the written word doesn’t.

Five Podcasts I Love and Recommend for Freelancers

Five Podcasts I Love

I love podcasts. LOVE podcasts. You know, I’ve loved them since the moment I heard about them. Whenever that was. And I’ve dreamed about having my own podcast for years now. I even built a business plan around a knitting-themed podcast but it never launched (still have all my notes though…).

Why are podcasts so great? Well I think it has something to do with the medium. Because I think radio is pretty great too. Listening to a person speak connects you in a way the written word doesn’t, and that’s saying something since writing is my passion. But podcasting? I love podcasts. In fact, I like them all: conversations, interviews, monologues, stories, poetry, scripted, silly, and everything in between.

Here’s when I listen to podcasts:

  • If I’m doing a brainless task I listen while I’m working
  • When driving
  • At the gym
  • Walking
  • When I’m weeding/watering the garden
  • Whenever I’m by myself
  • Sometimes I will listen with my husband while we’re on road trips, but he’s not as open to any and every podcast as I am so our playlist is a bit smaller

I often am asked what podcasts I recommend so I thought today I’d share my top five of the moment. I’m always listening to more than five but these are five I recommend over and over. Click on the image to check out the podcast.

The Fizzle Show Podcasts

The Fizzle Show Podcasts

With this podcast, I have an on-again, wow-I’m-sick-of-them relationship but I have listened since the beginning and am still subscribing, so they must be doing something right! Each week the team at Fizzle uploads a new episode aimed at small business owners who want to earn a living doing something they care about. They focus on modern business essentials, self employment, marketing, productivity, work-life balance, and more. Everything in their podcast points back to their small business training courses, which I have subscribed to for the past two years and have found amazing. I trust this team to give me the tools I need to run my business.

Copyblogger FM Podcasts

Copyblogger FM Podcasts

I love everything Copyblogger does and when they started podcasting I subscribed to every show. Well, there were a lot of shows and after a while I dropped most of them (or they got dropped…I’m not 100 per cent certain what’s going on TBH) and circled in on my favourite: Copyblogger FM. This is a short-form broadcast with solo shows and interviews focusing on content marketing, copy writing, email marketing, conversion, optimization, and more. They offer a few courses and products but I haven’t taken part (yet). But I do love their advice and would recommend their podcast and blog to anyone interested in improving their online communication.

Myths and Legends Podcasts

Myths and Legends

This is a new show in my podcast rotation. My husband and I discovered it while on a road trip earlier this year and while I thought it was something we’d listen to when together, I’ve gone ahead and listened to most of the archive plus all the new shows on my own. So I guess I like it. This is a solo podcast telling stories from myths, legends, and folklore from around the world. Some of the stories I’ve heard before, but I don’t think they ever get old. And yes, there are wizards, knights, and dragons—oh my!

Most of the podcasts in my rotation I’ve chosen because I think they can help me move the needle forward on my professional life. This one? Yeah, it’s pure entertainment. Of course there are valuable tips on how to creatively tell stories and create engagement, so I can still say I’m learning something! There seems to be an entire sub-culture around this podcast but I haven’t checked any of it out. So I guess I’m not there yet.

Online Marketing Made Easy Podcast

Online Marketing Made Easy

I think I have also listened to this podcast since the beginning. This (usually) solo podcast is a smart, in-depth look at online business. It focuses on all sorts of topics like marketing strategy, email list growth, Facebook ads, and more. I trust what I hear in this show to be a few steps ahead of me and teach me what’s going on in the ever-changing world of digital marketing just before I need to know it. I can’t say enough good things—this one has always been on my playlist and I continue finding great value from it. This podcast also points back to various courses you can purchase. I haven’t tried any out but they sound pretty good.

Under the Influence Podcast

Under the Influence

Before Under the Influence there was the show’s precursor, The Age of Persuasion. This show also airs on public radio in Canada and the US and I’ve loved everything about it for as long as I’ve known about it. This solo show is as scripted as it gets and while it takes a little getting used to, I wouldn’t want it any other way. Under the Influence is a behind-the-scenes look at the advertising industry and filled with fascinating case studies from the past and present, showing how marketing and human nature intersect. I think it’s so amazing the moment I learned the host was coming to speak at a local event I dropped everything to go. I booked off work, hustled my way into a ticket, walked 18 blocks in the rain, and showed up 30 minutes early to get the best seat. Yeah. Big fan.


And those are my top five podcast recommendations for you! I hope you can find something new and interesting to listen to—something that inspires you to take action on whatever you’re holding back on right now. Oh, and I’m always taking new podcast recommendations too so if there’s one I need to check out please let me know!

Other Podcasting Posts

Why are podcasts so great? Well I think it has something to do with the medium. Listening to a person speak connects you in a way the written word doesn't.

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Why are podcasts so great? Well I think it has something to do with the medium. Listening to a person speak connects you in a way the written word doesn't.