Want to Work from Home? Consider Freelance Writing!

When you’re first thinking about finding a work from home gig you may not think writing is a good bet.

Because you see loooots of websites not paying a cent to contributors.

Want to work from home? Consider freelance writing!

Or you scope out the job boards and see things like $20 or $50 per 500, 700 or 2,000 word post.

And if that’s all you’re seeing then you’re right, writing makes no sense because there’s no money in it.

Except, there is.

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SIDEBAR | Want to work from home as a freelance writer?

I was interviewed about writing for the Publishing for Profit podcast. If you’d like an introduction to what earning a living from writing can look like make sure to check it out.

Transcript: Robyn Roste | How to Become A Freelance Writer


Freelance writing work from home ideas

If you’re feeling at a loss for how to make money from writing I understand. I felt the same way back when I began freelancing.

Because I was approached by agencies and PR firms every now and then to pitch their products on my website, I knew it was possible…but how?

You can spend a lot of time Interneting on this topic. My advice? Do a bit of prep work before you jump down the rabbit hole of research.

I’ve mentioned this a few (hundred) times before so forgive me if I’m getting repetitive. But I’m going to say it again anyway.

If you want freelance jobs that pay a living wage, your best bet is to position yourself in a niche (or market) and become an expert in your field.

Think about these areas when considering your niche/focus/target market

  • Your background, experience, passions, skills and talents
  • Your network (Who do you know? What do they do? Do they need a writer?)
  • Consider the types of clients you think you want to work with. Would you enjoy working with/for them and the topics you’d be writing about? (If not, switch it up)
  • Ask: do my target clients need help explaining and marketing their products and services?

Want to work from home? I've created a worksheet to help you answer these questions. Just sign up to my email list and I'll send you the password for my resource library. When you're there, navigate to the Freelancing category and download the "Freelancer Positioning Worksheet."

By the way, I’ve created a worksheet to help you answer these questions. Just pop your email address into the form below and I’ll send you the password for my resource library. When you’re there, navigate to the freelancing category and download the “Freelancer Positioning Worksheet.”

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Simple, but not easy

For many of us, we think of work from home gigs and freelance jobs like a bit of extra money. And when you think of it like that then maybe you’ll be fine with a few bucks here and a few bucks there.

And if that’s you, no shame. You’ll find many, many outlets to write for.

But if you want to earn a living, or even bring in a part-time income, while working reasonable hours then do pay attention to your positioning before you enter the world of content mills and racing to the bottom.

While I have tons of advice for building your client roster and positioning yourself as a freelancer, today I’m going to focus on my BEST tip for getting started fast.

Want to work from home? While I have tons of advice for building your client roster and positoning yourself as a freelancer, today I'm going to focus on my BEST tip for getting started fast.

Want to work from home? Tap your network

In my experience, most freelancers get their start from someone they know.

So it’s worth considering that your first client may be either someone you know or a referral from someone you know.

This is so stupid-simple that most people bush it off, but think about it. We have huge, inter-connected networks of friends and family who are employed in various industries across the globe.

SOMEONE knows SOMEONE who could use a freelance writer.

And why not go to the community where you’ll get the absolute warmest reception to start?

A place where people already know, like and trust you—and WANT you to succeed?

Start small, focus your efforts on “connectors”

Connectors are the people in your network who know a lot of people and enjoy introducing people to each other. This is the type of person you need right now!

Reach out with a short message explaining about how you’re thinking you’d like to work from home and do they know anyone who works with freelance writers or needs a writer.

Be honest and upfront, and don’t expect too much on this first interaction.

Here’s an example from a different industry to make my point about why this works

A couple winters ago my area experienced a brutal ice storm, which damaged several trees on my property. We cleaned up what we could but there were these scary, spindly half broken branches hanging from the top of two birch trees, maybe 50 or 60 feet high.

We knew they were sketchy, but we didn’t know what to do. Who do you call when you need a service that you don’t know anything about?

The first thing we did? Asked our network.

A neighbour responded and took a look, giving us a few ideas. One of the options was calling a guy he knew who works as an arborist (tree surgeon) and freelances on the side.

We went with this suggestion for two reasons:

  1. We value our neighbour’s opinion and put a lot of stock in what he recommends
  2. When possible we prefer working with entrepreneurs or small businesses rather than large companies on our house projects

My husband hired the guy and he came over the next week, taking all the scary, dangerous branches down while leaving the rest of the tree in tact (that was important to me).

We didn’t price shop or check references because we had such a high opinion of our neighbour’s recommendation. He told us to hire the guy, so we did.

Now, this absolutely could have backfired and in other stories I could tell, I’ve had that experience. But this is what I mean when I say there’s power in your network.

If you know a connector who is well-regarded in your circles, imagine the power of their recommendations.

Now imagine them recommending you.

When someone comes to them saying they have this content problem they need to solve and your connector friend knows you’re looking to work from home as a writer, THEY WILL MAKE THE INTRODUCTION.

And, it’s possible your experience will be just like mine when hiring an arborist. That person may trust the connector’s recommendation so much that they don’t think twice before hiring you.

It’s not a guarantee, but it’s a place to start.

Referrals are the lifeblood of freelancing. Networking is essential. But you won’t get a single gig if you don’t put yourself out there and let people know you’re available for hire.

So let’s get going on that.

If your warm leads don’t pan out, then move on to cold leads

You can learn more about that in cold pitching tips to get clients fast.

But really, try the other thing first.

If you want to work from home as a writer you may be feeling at a loss for how to get started. I get it. I felt the same way back when I began freelancing.

While I have tons of advice for building your client roster and positoning yourself as a freelancer, today I'm going to focus on my BEST tip for getting started fast.

One more thing. I think you’ll enjoy my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
If you want to work from home as a writer you may be feeling at a loss for how to get started. I get it. I felt the same way back when I began freelancing.

While I have tons of advice for building your client roster and positoning yourself as a freelancer, today I'm going to focus on my BEST tip for getting started fast.

What is a Flat Lay and How to Style One

What is a flat lay? I hear this all the time and up until a few months ago it was me asking the Internet. Here’s the quick answer: it’s a photograph shot from above, flat.

What is a flat lay and how to style one for Instagram

What is a flat lay and how to style one

Although this term is kind of sort of new (the earliest reference I can find is 2015) the style is not. It just went by different names.

Other names for flat lay

  • Flatlay (OK, that’s just a different spelling)
  • Collage
  • Bird’s-eye view
  • Top shot
  • God’s-eye view
  • Knolling (from the 80s, and the original flat lay)

If you’re styling your photo using a light background, natural light, and shooting it from above…then you already know what a flay lay photo is. You just didn’t have the vocabulary.

So. That was easy. How do I style a flat lay?

I love taking flay lay photos of books and movies because it makes them so much more interesting. The book or movie is the hero—none of the props should take attention away from the hero!—and everything else adds to the story.

Now you have to figure out what you’re going to take photos of. When figuring out what you want to showcase you also need to think about why.

  • Why are you showing this to your audience?
  • What makes it special?
  • Why do you want them to see it?

Whatever product or prop you land on, this becomes your “hero” or the focus of your composition.

But let’s break the flat lay down a bit using a personal example

I love taking flay lay photos of books and movies because it makes them so much more interesting.

The book or movie is the hero—none of the props should take attention away from the hero!—and everything else adds to the story.

If you look at the above examples, you can see I’ve achieved the storytelling angle better in some than others using props, background, and composition.

The more flat lays you do, the better you get at them (trust me). I shot these over a period of months using different techniques, camera angles, and lighting.

I also wanted to include my knitting photos so you can see a more minimalist approach. The easiest way to get consistent light and look is to shoot everything on the same day using similar props and the same background. I did this because I wanted a consistent look on my Instagram feed while showcasing my hand knit products.

I also wanted to include my knitting flat lays so you can see a more minimalist approach.

The easiest way to get consistent light and look is to shoot everything on the same day using similar props and the same background.

I did this because I wanted a consistent look on my Instagram feed while showcasing my hand knit products.

Here are a few tips for styling and shooting flat lays

Use a light background. In most cases, a piece of cardboard or a sheet will work great. A flat surface is ideal.

Try and style your flat lay. This can be difficult if you’re not artistic or confident with what looks good.

Here are a few questions to ask as you style:

  • Is my hero product the focus?
  • Do I like this composition?
  • What will make this more interesting?
  • What will my audience like?
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Take a few shots and then re-style your flat lay and take a few more shots. The more you tweak the better you’ll get at it.

If possible, use natural lighting. After MUCH trial and error I found a window in my house that lets in a consistent amount of natural light from day to day.

I created a nice little setup with a card table by the window so I can take advantage of the great light.

Try to be parallel to your flat lay when shooting. This is where things get interesting. You’ll need to be above the shot in order to get it right.

Try a stool, chair, step ladder, or whatever you need to get in the correct position.

I use a combination of a chair and a tripod but I’m always trying to get my shots more parallel.

Remember to take lots of photos and to move your flat lay composition around a bit so when you get to the photo editing you have a few options.

This may take a while at first but you will get better, I promise! If I can figure it out…then you’ll be just fine.


By the way, if you want to skip the taking photos part altogether, here’s a free starter kit of stock photos.

More social media tricks and tips

Pin for later

What is a flat lay? I hear this all the time and up until a few months ago it was me asking the Internet. Here's the quick answer: it's a photograph shot from above, flat.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
What is a flat lay? I hear this all the time and up until a few months ago it was me asking the Internet. Here's the quick answer: it's a photograph shot from above, flat.
What is a flat lay? It is when you take a photo from above, parallel to the styled objects you are shooting. It is a great way to showcase your products in an interesting and engaging light. Try different props, backgrounds, and textures to tell a story and involve your audience.

Schedule Social Media with These Free Apps and Services

Have you ever wondered which are the best tools to schedule social media with? You’re not alone. There are so many apps in this world it’s difficult to know which ones are worth the time to figure out.

best tools to schedule social media posts

Schedule social media with these free apps and services

It makes sense that people aren’t sure which scheduling apps and services are worth the trouble of figuring out…connecting to all their social media accounts…troubleshooting….

It also makes sense to ask around about what others are using to schedule social media posts.

If something is working, why not cut out the trial and error and get on with scheduling already!? I get it!

5 tips for optimizing your social media profiles free ebook

By the way, optimizing your social media profiles is important! You want to ensure potential clients know who you are, what you do, and why they should hire you.

Download your free ebook from my resource library! All you have to do is pop your email address into the form below and I’ll send you the password.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the social media section and download the ebook called “Social Media Optimization.”

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Last year I published my roundup of 15 best apps for writers and some of those apps are social media schedulers but today I’ll expand on those schedulers and list a few more of my favourites.

And I’ll also note all the apps and services I’m mentioning have free plans, which is great when you’re not 100 per cent sure you’ll want to stick with it for the long term.

A great get-to-know you, no strings attached, coffee date kind of relationship.

top 7 social media schedulers

Looking for a social media scheduler? Here are my top seven

Hootsuite

There’s a lot to love about Hootsuite. I used to use it for all my social media but now the free plan limits your scheduled posts to 5 so I’m limited in my working ahead.

Although I’m disappointed with the limitations this scheduling change makes, I still keep an eye on the Twitter lists I follow through Hootsuite.

It’s easy to organize and keeps me sharp. I also tested it for my Instagram and Pinterest posting but have since moved to different schedules for those. Because of the limited posts on the free plan.

I have used Hootsuite teams (paid account) for working with clients and I’m impressed with the analytics capabilities and the ability to co-ordinate with team members. That said it’s more than I need for my personal social media.

Robyn Roste standing outside Hootsuite headquarters in Vancouver, BC Canada

Recurpost

This is one of the newer schedulers in my arsenal but I think it’s a keeper. This is a “productivity enhancement tool,” which is a fancy way of saying you can manage your social media for multiple platforms from its dashboard.

In this way it’s a lot like Hootsuite but where it has a leg up is the content library. Here, I can add evergreen posts and create a schedule around the different libraries.

What does this mean? I can not only schedule my social media but I can have it repeat on whatever schedule I desire. I have all my evergreen blogs set up in Recurpost and they now drip out to my chosen social networks on the schedule I set. It is awesome!

You are limited to 100 posts in your content library in the free account, which means you’ll have to upgrade if you’re a content behemoth.

And with the stricter Twitter regulations of no identical Twitter posts you now have to create “variations” of your Tweets before the app will schedule them.

This does put a damper on my enthusiasm, as I was using this for Twitter the most. And I haven’t sat with these new restrictions long enough to know how I feel about my content strategy or how to deal with it yet.

Update for 2020: Recurpost emailed and asked me what it would take for me to upgrade to a paid plan.

My response: add Pinterest scheduling. If I could have all my social networks looping from my content library housed here I would gladly pay. But because I can’t, no dice.

Tailwind (affiliate link)

Speaking of Pinterest scheduling, Tailwind is basically your best friend. There have been other Pinterest schedulers but this is the one that has stood the test of time. And is, like, approved by Pinterest.

I mentioned I’ve tested using Hootsuite for scheduling pins and while it does work, Tailwind is completely optimized for the platform. They make it easy to use and follow Pinterest best practices. After much pondering, I did transfer my loyalty here.

There’s a free trial to check it out and see if it’s for you and then you can upgrade to a paid plan. Right now, this is the only scheduling tool I’m paying for and the reason is because I see the results.

While I’m not a Pinterest powerhouse user (by any means), I have seen significant website traffic as a result of focusing my energy and effort on Pinterest and using this beefy scheduling tool.

Tailwind also has a scheduling feature for Instagram but I haven’t given it a fair shot yet.

Sidenote: If you want to learn more about Pinterest read my guide for freelance writers

I use Tailwind to schedule social media (Pintrest).

Later (affiliate link)

Like Hootsuite, this is a social scheduling and planning tool. Unlike Hootsuite, it’s a visual planner.

What does this mean?

You can plug in your social media posts for the next week, month, whatever, and see how it looks as a collection—this is especially powerful for Instagram.

You can also save images, captions, and hashtags in the tool for easy re-use.

Once your post is scheduled it either publishes it for you sends a push notification (on Instagram) when it’s time.

The visual plan helps me see how each image works together and helps me stay on brand.

The free plan limits users to 30 scheduled posts and I’ve found I’m quite capable of maxing it out on Instagram.

Also, you’re limited to only the past two weeks of analytics with the free account so if you’re relying on Later for your IG metrics it’s something to keep in mind.

Since Instagram isn’t one of my primary social media networks in my current social media strategy I don’t worry too much about metrics but you may feel differently.

Buffer

Buffer is a great all-around social media scheduler. You can schedule posts across your social media accounts from this one hub as well as manage Twitter (likes, retweets, etc.) and set up optimal scheduling, which analyzes and suggests the best times to post on each platforms.

I use Buffer for a few client accounts (more on that in the next tool) and find it straightforward and streamlined. There are also analtyics, but only for the posts published through Buffer.

The free account limits your scheduling activity to 10 posts per social network. It’s because of this teeny tiny amount I can’t recommend it higher. Also the paid plan limits your scheduled posts to 100, so although I like Buffer I wouldn’t go all-in.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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Quuu

This is the craziest app in your schedule social media toolkit. I heard about it a while ago but couldn’t wrap my head around how I could use it. However, a friend re-introduced it to me and I decided I’d try it out.

And you know what? I love it!

Quuu is a hand-curated content service, which means they line up your social media content for you and schedule it on your chosen social media platforms.

Curating content is a big part of social media marketing, although it’s tough for many people to get on board with (and I get it!). They wonder how promoting other people’s content is going to help them.

And I know it’s a mind warp but this upside-down approach of promoting others to grow your platform IS legit. But curating content takes forever. That’s where Quuu comes in.

You are limited to two posts per platform per day and you cannot change the posts with the free plan. In the paid accounts you have more flexibility and say, so if that’s important to you then pay attention.

I use Buffer as a bridge between Quuu and my social media platforms. Quuu curates the content and passes it to Buffer, then Buffer schedules and posts it for me.

My biggest concern was the curated content wouldn’t match my brand or interests but I’ve been quite pleased with how spot on Quuu has been, even to the point of writing the Tweets how I would. Now that…is freaky.

IFTTT

This tool helps you automate your social media marketing with triggers (called Applets and Services), which are amazing and yet overwhelming since the options and combinations are endless.

It works like this: IF an action happens on your service (say, on Facebook) THEN the applet runs and does your desired action (say, posts what happened on Facebook to your Pinterest board).

It’s tricky to explain but I can tell you, it’s a time saver because it takes out the mundane repetitive tasks and automates them for you. You just need to know what you need.

I like all the different options IFTTT offers but I’m limited by my imagination—which recipes will work best for me? Which combinations of services and applets will move my marketing forward?

How much should I schedule social media and how much should I be in the moment, live and authentic? These are the questions. I learned about IFTTT from a friend who has a better explanation of its power so if you’re curious, check it out.

Are you ready to schedule with apps?

This list isn’t comprehensive but it is what I enjoy using these days. If you have any favourites I haven’t mentioned please enlighten me! I’m always looking for tools to help schedule social media and would love to try something new.

You may also like

There are a lot of apps in this world so it makes sense that people aren't sure which ones are worth the trouble of figuring out...connecting to all their social media accounts...troubleshooting.... It also makes sense to ask around about what others are using to schedule social media posts. If something is working, why not cut out the trial and error and get on with scheduling already!? I get it! Here are my favourite social media scheduling tools.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
I've tested and vetted these apps and recommend them to schedule social media with. There are a lot of apps, I hope this helps streamline your process!
There are a lot of apps in this world so it makes sense that people aren't sure which ones are worth the trouble of figuring out...connecting to all their social media accounts...troubleshooting.... It also makes sense to ask around about what others are using to schedule social media posts. If something is working, why not cut out the trial and error and get on with scheduling already!? I get it! Here are my favourite social media scheduling tools.

Freelance Jobs | 4 Simple Ways to Get Started

So you’ve decided to look for freelance jobs and you hope it will be for writing. And you’d like these gigs to pay well.

Freelance Jobs for Writers | 4 Steps for Finding High-Paying Writing GIgs

While much of my advice is aimed at writers who are already freelancing, or entrepreneurs who need content marketing to advance their business, I know many people also wonder how on earth they could get paid to write.

I get this question a lot!

Case in point: “This is a loaded question, but how does one start freelance writing?”

I received this text a few weeks back from a teacher who’s thinking about starting a freelance writing side hustle. I thought I’d unpack my answer here.

Instead of focusing on how to start a freelance business, I’m going talk about how to find and land high-paying freelance jobs.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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By the way, I was interviewed about this topic for the Publishing for Profit podcast.

If you’d like to see the video version it’s pretty much aligned with what I say below, although we meander a bit more.

Transcript: Robyn Roste | How to Become A Freelance Writer


Getting started: freelance jobs

You want to become a freelance writer? It all comes down to positioning.

  1. Figure out who you serve
  2. Nail down what you want to write
  3. Learn where your ideal clients are hanging out
  4. Find a way to meet these people—or get your work in front of them—so you can show them how you can solve their unique problem

A lot of people start their freelancing career by making a profile on marketplace sites like Upwork, Contently, Fiverr, etc.

Then they bid on jobs that are listed. If they get one they share their fee with that service.

While some people make a decent income from these sites I don’t like the model for a few reasons.

  • It’s super competitive
  • Fees are low
  • It’s hard to make a name for yourself
  • You don’t get all the money

How I started freelancing

I got my start from people coming to me and asking me to write for their sites or post on my blog about a certain product/company for money.

While this was flattering and fun, I didn’t have much control over anything because the company had recruited me and I was at the mercy of being discovered.

I had to write about what they wanted.

When I decided I wanted to up level my blog (and writing career) I realized that my online presence was super inconsistent.

My website was difficult to pitch to other companies for collaborations because it was random and for multiple industries. No niche, no focus, no point.

Once I got serious about being a freelance writer I got my assets into shape (website, blog, social media channels, everything) and started becoming the person I wanted others to see me as.

If you want to learn more about my story and how I figured out my positioning, read Branding Yourself: Choosing a Niche

The best way I’ve know how to make decent money as a freelancer is to go beyond general writing, choose a particular style/industry and go all in on that.

Meaning:

  • Choose a specialty and then get a lot of clips (writing samples) in that area
  • Instead of waiting for people to come to you or bidding on posted gigs, approach companies directly
  • Make sure the companies you approach are industry-specific and have healthy marketing budgets for freelancers!
freelance jobs writing

Want freelance jobs? Learn how to approach your target clients rather than wait for them to come to you

The writers I know who make a full-time living from freelancing? They aren’t successful because they wished to be a writer. They got clear on their positioning: who they write for and what they write.

Then they figured out where those people hang out and presented their message to them in a way that made it obvious it was a perfect match for what they were looking for.

This approach is a challenge but it’s better and there is less competition.

one caveat

If you haven’t figured out your positioning and you’re prospecting, you likely won’t be finding much success. Why? Because you haven’t put your marketing message in front of the right people. How could you? You don’t know who they are or what they need.

Want freelance jobs? Figure out your positioning

Becoming a successful freelance writer comes from getting clear on who you serve, what you do and how you can solve your ideal client’s problem.

A tough pill to swallow, but if you want to make it as a freelancer in this crowded space, this is how you stand out.

This is how you transform from someone who wishes they were a paid professional to someone who gets paid a living wage to write.

It’s possible and realistic to become a successful freelance writer. You just need to put in the work (but maybe not the work you thought).


Other Freelance Writing Articles

So you've decided to look for freelance jobs and you hope it will be for writing. While much of my advice is relevant to writers who are already freelancing or entrepreneurs who need to use content marketing to advance their business, I know many people also wonder how on earth they could get paid to write.

One more thing. I think you’ll enjoy my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
So you've decided to look for freelance jobs and you hope it will be for writing. While much of my advice is relevant to writers who are already freelancing or entrepreneurs who need to use content marketing to advance their business, I know many people also wonder how on earth they could get paid to write.

How to Market Yourself as a Writer

Hard news first, you need to learn how to market yourself as a writer if you want to make a living writing! But not in a creepy or pushy way. The goal from this training is to help you learn how to how to market yourself as a freelance writer in an authentic way.

How to Market Yourself as a Writer

How to market yourself as a writer

I know, I get it. You HATE marketing. And talking about yourself? Yeah, I know. You hate talking about yourself too.

But here’s the thing, when you’re self-employed you need marketing to get work.

When you’re a freelance writer you need to market YOU in order to get clients.

This is tough stuff, I know. But you need to put yourself out there. You need to market yourself as a writer.

The goal of this post is to help you understand how to market yourself as a writer. In an authentic way. Without being a sleaze-ball.

Yes, it’s possible to talk about yourself in a way that doesn’t feel weird or braggy.

Because you need to learn how to market yourself as a freelance writer if you want to make a living from your writing!

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
Click the image for more information, or pop your email address in the form below


When I first struck out as a freelancer I wasn’t sure how to sell myself to a potential client. So instead I defaulted to applying to random job board adverts and Craigslist postings.

And it was OK. Not great. But OK.

Then I came across a two-hour seminar at my local art gallery taught by a freelance writer about…well, freelance writing. How to get started. And I was like, YES! This is what I need!

I attended the seminar and connected with a couple people there. Those connections led me to a professional writer’s organization and connections with many more professional and freelance writers.

From there I found a mentor and found my career moving forward. If I hadn’t put myself out there and asked “how do I make this happen?” I don’t know where I would be now.

Then what happened?

As I advanced in my skills and learned the different types of writing, I discovered much of the time my clients had a marketing problem as well as a writing problem.

In fact, once I learned how to combine the two skills things really began taking off.

And I also discovered many writers have marketing problems.

They’re great at writing about others but when it comes to talking about what they do they’re struck with writer’s block. They fumble, they ramble, they stress right out.

It’s time to fix that.


How to market yourself as a writer

There is a way to talk about who you are and what you do without coming across as promotional or insincere.

But you have a few mental barriers to overcome before you’ll see it.

So many people see marketing as sleazy, scary, and overwhelming and if you can’t get past that perception then you’ll never feel comfortable talking about your work.

I’ve talked to so many writers about this I’m pretty sure the objections against marketing narrow down to about four excuses.

Reasons why you think you hate marketing yourself as a freelance writer

  • You don’t know what to say
  • Or because you don’t want to get shot down
  • Maybe you don’t know how to explain what you do
  • You don’t want to limit your options by putting yourself out there

Identify with any of these?

I get it!

But let’s move past them and flip the conversation around.

Think about the people you write for, the problems you solve for clients and readers with your writing and the solution you provide for your readers/clients.

Yes you may be a generalist but even then you have a “type.”

Think about it a bit, commit a few ideas to writing, and then think about how you can describe the service you provide to others.

By the way, we talked about this a bit in how to write an elevator pitch so you may already have these jotted down somewhere.

Crafting an elevator pitch is an awesome way to talk about yourself. It’s short, to the point, and focuses on the benefits you offer.

When you talk about how you serve others you turn the conversation around from “me-focused” to “others-focused.”

And that changes marketing from sleazy to helpful. Just like that.

Because if you’re providing a valuable service to the world, why wouldn’t you want people to know about it?

If you could help someone grow their business through your writing services…don’t you owe it to them to at least share how you could help them?

See what I’m saying?

By learning how to market yourself as a writer you learn how to put yourself out there by focusing on your clients.

You highlight the value your work brings to others’ lives and how your writing could help this person with their current struggle.

No pressure. No sales pitch. Just relationship building. Learn how to market yourself in this way and it will be effortless and authentic.

Learn how to market yourself as a writer

This is why I love marketing.

Because I know there are so many talented, amazing people out there who are working at making the world a better place.

But most of the time we’ll never hear about it unless they share it with us.

By learning how to talk about yourself and what you do in a genuine, helpful, others-focused way, you shed the skin of creepy-scary-pushy-marketing and enter into a much friendlier space where you make new friends, share your stories, and look for opportunities to collaborate.

The bottom line is this. People don’t care about what you do, they care about the benefit they’ll get from working with you.

This isn’t meant to be harsh, (but…it’s not about you, so let’s rip the bandage off now shall we?) just a re-framing of how we look at our businesses.

You care a lot about what you do, and you should.

But when you market yourself as a writer, you need to keep it outward-focused so potential clients can see the benefit to THEM by working with you.

Other helpful articles

Hard news first, you need to market yourself as a writer if you want to make a living writing! But not in a creepy or pushy way. The goal from this training is to help you become an authentic marketer.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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Hard news first, you need to market yourself as a writer if you want to make a living writing! But not in a creepy or pushy way. The goal from this training is to help you become an authentic marketer.