Tips for Spreading the Love on Social Media

Spreading the love on social media. We could all use more love, couldn’t we?

spread the love on social media

This year, I’m resolving to do less of the mindless scroll and more adding goodness to the social landscape. Care to join me? Here are eight ideas for spreading the love on social media. They’re not invasive, they’re not difficult, and they’re not rocket science. But sometimes they’re tough to remember.

If we let it, social media can make us feel horrible. We all know it but still allow people’s picture-perfect feeds to get us down. It’s why we’re so focused (borderline obsessed?) on authenticity and honesty—we understand what we see on social media feeds isn’t reality, but it’s difficult to stop comparing.

I wrote about four ways to overcome social media comparison over on Faith Strong Today if you’re interested in changing your self-talk but need a bit of a push.

Want to save this love-filled social media strategy for future reference?

Do it, it’s easy!

  • To download: Right-click on an image to save it on your desktop
  • To pin: If you want to save it to your Pinterest board direct from this page, the Tailwind app will help you out!

8 Tips for Spreading the Love on Social Media

spreading the love on social media be generous with your likes

1. Be generous with your likes

This is something I’m trying to do more of. What does it cost me to “like” someone’s status or post? Not much. But what can it add to someone else’s day? Maybe a lot. I don’t go through and “like” everything I see, but if something makes me pause, think, or smile, I make sure to (at least) like it.

spreading the love on social media leave kind genuine comments

2. Leave kind, genuine comments

One of the communities I’m in started practicing this and I realized how encouraging it is to receive comments on social media posts. So much more than I thought. Now that I’m aware I make sure to leave comments as often as I can, and as nice as I can.

spreading the love on social media tell someone something nice

3. Tell someone something nice

This launches from my last point. Doesn’t it feel good when someone notices something you’re working hard on and compliments you? Or tells you you’re doing a great job? I have decided to be more intentional about doing this for others. When I notice something awesome, mention it. And now that I’m trying to notice what others are doing I’m seeing a lot more to mention! I love how it helps me keep my eyes on others rather than on myself.

spreading the love on social media try to make someone laugh

Here’s a great tip.

4. Try to make someone laugh

Yes I do mean post hilarious memes, GIFs, and videos. Why not? Maybe even post an epic Throwback Thursday photo and make someone smile. Who says we need to be serious all the time? Life is serious enough.

spreading the love on social media post something beautiful

5. Post something beautiful

Along the lines of posting something fun, what about posting something beautiful? An amazing landscape, a cute animal, or a stunning piece of art…think about what would bring joy or awe to someone else’s day and add it to your feed.

spreading the love on social media post something encouraging

6. Post something encouraging

In my new and improved approach to social media I’ve started asking what would be helpful and uplifting to the people who I’m connected with on social media. When I approach my posting strategy from this viewpoint I find I have a lot to say—and I find in trying to be encouraging it’s filling me up as well. How cool!

spreading the love on social media highlight someone you look up to

7. Highlight someone you look up to

If someone is doing a great job why not give them a shout out? A friend of mine is doing this on her Instagram feed and I’m finding it so awesome. If someone has helped you out in you life or career why WOULDN’T you honour them in this way? Love this so much.

spreading the love on social media follow people who inspire you

8. Follow people who inspire you

One of the best ways I’ve found to stay positive on social media is by following people with the same agenda—following those already spreading the love on social media and inspiring me to do the same. Why not fill your feed with the change you want to see?


These are my top tips for spreading the love on social media but I’ve love to hear your ideas. Let me know in the comments…or on social media.

Want more about social media?

This year, I'm resolving to do less mindless scrolling and more spreading the love on social media. Care to join me? Here are eight ideas.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
Spreading the love on social media. We could all use more love, couldn't we? This year, I'm resolving to do less of the mindless scroll and more of the adding goodness to the social landscape. Care to join me? Here are eight ideas for spreading the love on social media. They're not invasive, they're not difficult, and they're not rocket science. But sometimes they're tough to remember.
This year, I'm resolving to do less mindless scrolling and more spreading the love on social media. Care to join me? Here are eight ideas.

How to Start a Successful Online Business During a Pandemic

During the pandemic it may have crossed your mind that it’s time to start an online business. Or podcast. Or YouTube channel. Etc.

How to Start a Successful Online Business During a Pandemic

But you didn’t know where to start.

Or you did start, but it didn’t stick.

If you’re wondering how to start a successful online business and make the most of your extra at-home time during this pandemic, I hope these tips will help.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
Click the image for more information, or pop your email address in the form below

How to start a successful online business during a pandemic

By the way, if you are running a business online you will need some sort of online presence. You can definitely get started without having a website but eventually you will want an owned asset that you control.

If this is where you’re at, there are many ways to create affordable websites by hiring designers or even finding an out-of-the-box solution.

Extra credit: 7 Essential Freelance Writer Website Elements

If you made your plans to start an online business before the pandemic, you may have to take another look at your business model again before you launch.

Because things have changed.

Take a look at the state of the online world and let it serve as a guide for how you proceed. Regardless of what you hear about the economy, businesses are making money (just not all of them).

When starting a new business, watch your metrics and adjust as needed. That’s the beauty of online business (and the curse): instant feedback.

What will your business offer?

While you do need to make money if you’re running a business, you also need to have a strong handle on your product or service.

Whatever you’re offering, it needs to solve a fundamental problem for your customer.

And while OF COURSE you can jump on a trend and make a fast buck, it will go as fast as it comes. If you want to start an online business that lasts, you need to understand the solutions customers want.

Hot tip: keep in mind their needs may have changed since the pandemic.

Extra credit: Discover Your Ideal Reader

Wondering what an ideal customer or reader is? Download this free worksheet!

This is a fictional persona to whom your writing will most appeal. While this is not a scientific process, creating a profile helps you write with purpose and enables you to craft elements into your writing that surprises and delights this person.

Your ideal reader represents who you are writing to. It’s one person, not many people. This is a specific process and if you do it right, your ideal reader will come alive in your mind.

What this means is you need to figure out who your ideal reader is, what his or her interests are, and why your ideal reader reads. Your most important question is why will your ideal reader be interested in your book? Whatever the why, all readers have one and it’s your job to discover it for your ideal reader.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by signing up here, or by filling in the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

Here’s one suggestion for figuring out how to adjust your business strategy.

Analyze flourishing industries and look at how they’ve pivoted or adjusted during the pandemic. Pay attention to what they offer and how they position their products and services.

Next, think about your services or products and find innovative ways to deliver those solutions.

Some industries that have thrived this year include delivery services, personal grooming, pharmaceuticals, pet products and gardening.

Your business plan and model should delineate your target audience and clearly identify their needs. If it doesn’t, keep working on it.

By the way, if you’re not sure how to research ideas for your online business plan I recommend SEO and keyword research. This will help you figure out what people are already searching for, if anyone’s interested in your idea and how competitive your niche is.

Extra credit: SEO Tips and Tricks for Freelance Writers

Focus on marketing online

YES you have to do marketing. It’s basically the most important thing you can do after coming up with a product or service that meets an actual need your ideal customer has.

Employ innovative marketing strategies and techniques that will best promote your products and services, bringing the customer closer to you. It is all about creating a sense of belonging, a community of individuals with similar needs.

Smart marketers focus on creating relationships with their customers, and you should do the same. You can build relationships through blog posts, responding to comments on social media, having live Q&A sessions, publishing short videos and holdling customer participation events.

It is important to stay in touch with marketing trends. Not to the point of having shiny object syndrome of course, but you definitely want to pay attention to what’s working in the online business arena.

Extra credit: Content Marketing Ideas to Keep Your Prospect Funnel Full

Online businesses need streamlined payments

This might not seem important at first glance but think about when you’re making a purchase online. If the payment process is complex or glitchy, do you complete the payment? Do you stick with it? Probably not.

So if you’re selling a product online, make sure you have a secure, streamlined processor. And if you’re making payments online, or invoicing clients, this is worth thinking about too!

There are many online payment services that can give you options that’s both flexible and secure.

Starting an online business: final thoughts

Make sure your product or service is as advertised. It’s too important to skip this step! Your online business will live and die from reviews and you need those happy customers to back up your business to help you grow.

To conclude, if you decide to start an online business during this pandemic, be ready to adapt. You can succeed following these tips and fine-tuning them to best suit your business. The most important thing is to provide value for your customers through products and services that serve them and meet their needs.

During the pandemic it may have crossed your mind that it's time to start an online business. Or podcast. Or YouTube channel. Etc.

If you're wondering how to start a successful online business and make the most of your extra at-home time during this pandemic, I hope these tips will help.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

How to Plan a Podcast in 9 Steps

First things first, this is not a technical how-to create and produce a podcast guide. This is the step you take before that. AKA this is a training on how to plan a podcast. With a podcast planning worksheet!


How to plan a podcast in 9 steps podcast planning worksheet and tutorial

I’ve also written an ebook on this same topic. It’s available from Gumroad as an Epub, Mobi or PDF for $7.99. It’s called Plan Your Podcast Playbook. Thank you for your support!


Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
Click the image for more information, or pop your email address in the form below

Yes. I’m saying think about your podcast ahead of time and develop a strategy.

How to plan a podcast, from personal experience

I’ve lived these nine steps while creating and launching podcasts so I’m not pulling these out of thin air. Planning a podcast is exhilarating, exciting, and exhausting.

At so many points on this journey I said “this is the hardest part, once we’re past this we’re good.” I’m glad I knew the steps or I may have lost heart through the process.

I share them with you today so you will also be empowered the next time you wonder if you should start a podcast. You’ll know what the steps are and how to plan a podcast.

You’ll also know how much work you have ahead of you so you’re mentally prepared for the roller coaster you’re about to get on.

Podcasting is an amazing, amazing media and, when done right, a game changer.

free podcast planning worksheet

Do you want the worksheet that goes with this training?

I’ve created worksheets to complement this training, available for download. This is a free resource but it’s part of my resource library and you’ll need a password. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the “miscellaneous” section and download the “How to Plan a Podcast Worksheet.”

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

First I’ll overview the steps, then break them down a bit.

How to plan a podcast in nine steps

  1. Brainstorm a concept and decide what your show is about
  2. Determine your “why”
  3. Set goals for your podcast
  4. Figure out who you’re serving
  5. Plot your content strategy
  6. Develop your show and assets
  7. Write, record, and produce your first three episodes
  8. Develop your marketing strategy
  9. Pre-launch baby!

And once your podcast is planned, in the process of being developed, and you’re running pre-launch…now you can finish setting everything up and launch your podcast.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Back to step one.

How to plan a podcast step one: Brainstorm a concept and decide what your show is about

If you’re thinking about doing a podcast there’s a good chance you’ve thought about this to some extent. So, write it down.

What’s the big idea? What’s your show about?

I encourage you to get to a core topic, one you stick to throughout your show. A strong topic will make things easier down the road, plus it will be easy for listeners to understand what your show’s about without too much thought.

You want your show to stick in listener’s minds and be something they can become fanatic about—sharing on social media, recommending to friends, and becoming raving fans.

So come up with a good one, alright?

Step two: Determine your “why”

Attracting listeners who become raving fans starts with your reason for podcasting. Think about it for a sec, why should anyone listen to your podcast?

Why should people choose yours over all the other podcasts out there? Why?

It’s so easy to jump past the planning and straight into podcast production but I encourage you to slow down and do the hard work first. Plan a podcast, plan a great podcast.

Plan a podcast

Step three: Set goals for your podcast

(Can you believe she’s talking about goal setting AGAIN!?)

Believe it!

But it’s step three, so by this point you already know what you want to do and why—so shouldn’t setting goals be easy?

Podcasts are powerful for building an audience and increasing your platform and can even help you reach your business goals. So, what is your goal for this podcast?

And if it’s to make money…you’re going to need a plan to do that. Putting up a podcast doesn’t equal cash money. Not that in itself at any rate.

So wipe the dollar signs out of your eyes and set some realistic goals. Making money can be one of your goals, but you’re going to need a revenue plan. Think it through, set S.M.A.R.T. goals, and then move on to step four.

Create S.M.A.R.T. Goals

How to plan a podcast step four: Figure out who you’re serving

You should kind of sort of know this already. Who do you hope listens to your podcast? Who do you want to become raving fans?

I know, you want everyone to love it…but please break it down a little.

Who do you want listening and what transformation do you want them to experience as a result of listening to your podcast?

How will you help listeners reach their goals?

Because, like everything, they need to understand what’s in it for them before they’ll decide to stick around. If you map this desired transformation out, it will also guide you RIGHT into step five.

So give it a shot, kay?

How to plan a podcast step five: Plot your content strategy

Now this is fun stuff. If you figured out the transformation you want listeners to experience and brainstormed a step-by-step guide for them to get there…you can break those steps down into individual episodes!

Right!? Yes!!!

OK maybe I’m nerding out but you want a strategy because this will keep you laser focused on providing the RIGHT content to the RIGHT people for the RIGHT reasons.

Strategy is just RIGHT OK!?

Here you figure out your core content, your sub topics (sidenote, this is similar/the same as creating a content strategy for your blog), your show format, and individual show objectives (goals within goals—you know the big goal of the entire podcast but what do you want listeners to do in each one? Leave a review, go to your website, download an email opt-in, share on social media, follow you on Instagram, etc. And please pick one per episode).

If you’re stuck for ideas you can do keyword research (see what’s popular and develop episode ideas from there). Try and come up with at least 10 solid episode topics before moving on.


Get the ebook!


How to plan a podcast step six: Develop your show and assets

By this point you should be getting pretty excited about your show.

And step six is where all your dreaming turns into your core content and branding.

And yes, this will be hard work and may involve blood, sweat, and tears (if you’re anything like me). You don’t have to script your episodes word-for-word (unless you work best like that/want to)—outlines and notes are fine—but you do need to work out your show sequence and figure out who you want on your show if you’re taking guests/doing interviews.

At this point you should also be working on things like finalizing your show name, designing your logo, figuring out website design, deciding on your branding, grabbing all your social media handles, and purchasing your URL.

I know many people will do this first and other guides may even advise doing this second/third.

Why I’m saying wait till step six is because by this point you KNOW you’re sticking with it. You have a firm grasp on where you’re going and how you’re getting there.

And if you’re hiring someone to help with any of your asset development, showing him/her your target audience, listener transformation, and content strategy will help him/her come up a great concept reflecting you to a T.

9 Steps to Planning a Podcast Worksheet (free podcast planning worksheet)

Want the free PDF podcast planning worksheet?

I’ve formatted these nine tips as a podcast planning worksheet download for you, in case you want to refer to them later. This is a free resource but it’s part of my resource library and you’ll need a password. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the miscellaneous section and download the “How to Plan a Podcast Worksheet.”

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

How to plan a podcast step seven: Write, record, and produce your first three episodes

OK, I won’t sugar coat it. This is going to be a lot of work. But you are READY for this!

Draft your episodes, record them, and get them ready. You’re not publishing anything yet, but you’re working out the bugs.

You need to figure out what you’re saying, practice saying it, and get all the technological pieces in order.

Going through this will also highlight how much help you need recording, editing, producing, etc.

(If you need technical help check out Pat Flynn’s How to Start a Podcast tutorial. If you need an audio editor or show producer, get in touch.)

This process should show you how close you are to launching your podcast. You may need more time than you thought at the outset, but that’s OK. You’re in it for the long haul, so it’s worth doing right.

How to plan a podcast step eight: Develop your marketing strategy

You have your content plan, your branding, website, and social channels are taking shape, and you have a general idea of when you can launch.

Now it’s time to think about marketing. You’re going to need a pre-launch, a launch, and an ongoing strategy.

Three strategies.

I know it’s a lot of work (ugh, Robyn, why is EVERYTHING so much work!?) but you will be so super glad you made the plan ahead of time when you’re in the thick of it.

Whatever you decide, I recommend getting the plan on paper and calendaring as much as possible.

This is where you figure out the details of your pre-launch, launch, and ongoing marketing, when your podcast episodes will publish and how often, what you’re posting on social media and how often, and how you’re going to promote your podcast to the world.

How to plan a podcast step nine: Pre-launch baby!

When you have your launch date settled and all your marketing ducks in a row, you can graduate to pre-launch.

This is going to be intense, but this step is critical to a successful launch so you don’t want to skip it. In step eight you created the plan and in step nine you WORK the plan.

That’s right, you’re creating content, you’re connecting with your target audience, and you’re ramping up to your launch. In pre-launch you’re putting yourself and your podcast out into the world in a way that people notice.

You do this by creating amazing and shareable content, promoting your amazing and shareable content to your existing audience, with your social networks, with online communities, with relevant influencers, and wherever else your target audience hangs out.

Whew.

I know we’ve been through a lot getting to this point. But it’s not over yet.

Once your pre-launch gets in gear you are racing towards your launch day—now that’s exciting stuff.

Good thing you know what you’re doing, where you’re going, and who you’re talking to. I can’t WAIT to hear how it goes. Have a great launch!

First things first, this is not a technical how-to create and produce a podcast guide. This is the step you take before that. Yes. I'm saying think about your podcast ahead of time and develop a strategy. AKA this is a training on how to plan a podcast.

Free podcast planning worksheet included!

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
First things first, this is not a technical how-to create and produce a podcast guide. This is the step you take before that. Yes. I'm saying think about your podcast ahead of time and develop a strategy. AKA this is a training on how to plan a podcast.
First things first, this is not a technical how-to create and produce a podcast guide. This is the step you take before that. Yes. I'm saying think about your podcast ahead of time and develop a strategy. AKA this is a training on how to plan a podcast.

You may also like How to Create a Social Media Porfolio

6 Creative Places to Look for the Best New Clients

There are a lot of places to find clients but the well-known places are competitive.

Since I like avoiding hustle whenever possible (unless, you know, I need clients YESTERDAY) I like looking in less-obvious places for freelance work.

creative places to find clients

Do you want the worksheet that goes with this training?

I’ve created worksheets to complement this training, available for download. This is a free resource but it’s part of my resource library and you’ll need a password. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the freelancing section and look for “Creative Places to Find Clients Worksheet.”

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

Creative places to find clients

Part of me wants to keep these creative places a secret so I’ll be the only one who knows about them.

But a bigger part of me wants to help other freelancers find work so here we go. Maybe there’s a new idea or two in here for you today.

Idea #1: From your day job

While this is an awesome place to find clients you do need to pay attention to your company’s privacy policy and it’s better if you keep your boss in the loop with any outside-of-work relationships you have with work affiliates.

Assuming everything is above board and your freelance work happens outside of your day job, doing some side gig stuff with people you interact with every day makes a lot of sense.

On a professional level they know, like, and trust you as you do them. And you already know you can work well together.

You just need to keep the boundaries in tact so you don’t overstep in either direction.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
Click the image for more information, or pop your email address in the form below

Idea #2: From your family and friends

I’ve mentioned this before (the best way to let people know you’re available for freelance work is by telling them you’re available for freelance work) but it’s one of those sort of awkward things so I want to mention it again.

What you don’t want is to bug your friends and family and have them throw pity work at you.

You also don’t want them to assume since they’re your friends and family you’ll work for a massive discount (or for free).

So how do you create an environment where your friends and family know you’re available for freelance work and are happy to pay you for it?

Now, that is the finesse of it. Everyone will find her own balance so the takeaway here is to put yourself out there and let people know you’re available.

Idea #3: From places you’re a client

This is another time where you’ll need to tread with care and be sensitive to appropriate timing but there’s nothing wrong with mentioning you’re a freelancer while engaging in small talk and allowing the conversation to go where it may.

I’ve had many experiences where I’m asked to leave my card behind or picked up the odd client from a place where I’m a client. I love it!

Of course you’re not becoming a client in order to find clients…that’s not a hustle I’d recommend, but if it happens organically…awesome!

Free downloadable worksheet

Do you want the worksheet that goes with this training?

I’ve created worksheets to complement this training, available for download. This is a free resource but it’s part of my resource library and you’ll need a password. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the freelancing section and look for “Creative Places to Find Clients Worksheet.”

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

Idea #4: From guest blogging

Guest blogging, guest writing (whatever), is an interesting beast.

If you look around the Internet for long enough you’ll see a wide variety of opinions and teachings on why you should do guest blogging, why you shouldn’t do guest blogging, why you should never write for free, why you should write for free sometimes, etc.

I’m not here to talk about any of that. I think you should figure out what is going to move the needle forward and then do it with abandon.

Anyway, got a little off topic there.

If you get into guest blogging and are choosing good partners, this could turn into a writer-client relationship.

Honest! I’ve seen it happen! So keep building into your relationships!

Idea #5: From partnerships

This idea launches from the last one—build relationships with others and form mutually-beneficial relationships.

This could be an agency, a freelancer with complimentary skills, or a local business. The big idea is you share clients.

No you don’t get 100 per cent of the pay but you also don’t have to do 100 per cent of the work and in some cases this is an awesome arrangement.

Unique ideas for finding clients

Idea #6: From local events/workshops

Something I’ve noticed about freelancers is they’re out in the community a lot.

Working freelance has them attending events, observing meetings, and talking to a lot of different people.

So what about throwing a little extra networking in while you’re already out? Do what you’re there to do but also mention you’re a freelance writer and if it makes sense, mention you’re available for hire or pass out a business card or two.

This last point is extra exciting to me these days because I’m in the midst of building a workshop for freelancers, which developed from a pre-existing relationship, turned into a collective and is now a collaboration.

Wow.

When we began building these relationships this workshop was not even a dream. And yet, here we are.

Places to find clients: In conclusion

I hope I’ve given you a few new ideas to try here. Remember, marketing is a long game and it’s something you sprinkle into every day—while you’re busy doing other things.

If you want some more tips and tricks you’ll enjoy my article on learning how to rock your marketing even when you don’t have time for marketing.

There are a lot of places to find clients but the well-known places are competitive. Maybe there's a new idea or two in here for you today.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
There are a lot of places to find clients but the well-known places are competitive. Maybe there's a new idea or two in here for you today.
There are a lot of places to find clients but the well-known places are competitive. Since I like avoiding hustle whenever possible (unless, you know, I need clients YESTERDAY) I like looking in less-obvious places for freelance work. Part of me wants to keep these creative places a secret so I'll be the only one who knows about them but a bigger part of me wants to help other freelancers find work so here we go. Maybe there's a new idea or two in here for you today.

3 Reasons Why Firing a Client Has to Happen

If you’ve freelanced for any amount of time you may have considered firing a client at some point.

Firing a Client | Freelance Writing Tips

It sounds harsh and scary, I mean…you’ve worked so hard to land these clients! And now you’re thinking about firing them? Isn’t that a bit ungrateful?

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
Click the image for more information, or pop your email address in the form below

Firing a client

Truth is, sometimes it’s not a good fit.

Here is a story to put this type of situation in context. A few weeks ago a fellow freelancer contacted me. She said, “Have you ever quit a client? I am seriously considering it and I am having trouble finding wisdom!”

Of course, I was happy to talk it out. This isn’t an easy decision to make. Because you want it to work! Or you feel guilty because you thought it was a good fit but now that you’re a few months in you can tell it’s not. It’s OK, this happens.

My friend said the work just wasn’t what she thought it was. The way her clients assigned, reviewed and approved work felt to her like someone was always watching over her shoulder and tweaking her work over and over until it no longer resembled something she would have created. This didn’t work for her.

She knew she couldn’t continue like this, no amount of sucking it up was going to fix it. So she wondered if she should fire her client and make a clean break or if she should offer feedback and see if they were willing to change their processes.

How much did she want to keep this client?

No matter what she decided, she knew she had to make a change. When a freelancing situation goes a bit sour it can make you feel inept and underpaid. It’s frustrating and tricky and when this happens it’s definitely time to consider firing a client or two.

If you are in a place where you feel like your client isn’t a good fit it doesn’t mean you’re being a diva. It may just mean you’re becoming clear on what kind of freelancer you want to be.

Sometimes the right decision is a polite yet clear discussion about the situation and finding a workable solution. And sometimes the right decision is referring the client to a different freelancer and moving on.

Is it time to find some new clients? I’ve created a worksheet outlining six creative ways to find good clients. Just pop your email address into the form below and I’ll send you the password for my resource library.

When you’re there, navigate to the freelancing section and download the “Creative Places to Find Clients Worksheet.”

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required

Blogger turned copywriter

Sometimes you outgrow the relationship or go different directions.

One of my first regular clients was my DREAM COME TRUE. I was tasked with tackling DIY projects with a bent towards upcycling and then writing a blog post about it. I loved DIY and upcycling and I couldn’t have asked for a better freelance writing gig.

Things went well for quite a while and I enjoyed the different projects I got to work on. But as my writing improved and my career progressed, I found myself less and less engaged.

The projects were time intensive and the pay was low. While I was fine with this when I was first getting started after a few years it didn’t make sense anymore.

Plus my other freelance writing clients were not in the DIY/crafting space so my portfolio was moving further and further away from this niche.

The big sign that it was time to move on was the sense of dread I felt whenever a deadline loomed. I no longer scoured Pinterest looking for new and exciting projects to try. Now I looked for projects I could do in an hour or less composed of materials I already had on hand.

When I took an honest look at the writing projects I had on my plate and how they made me feel, I realized I had outgrown this client, my heart was no longer in it and it was time to move on.

Firing a Client | Freelance Writing Tips

Freelance writing opportunities

Sometimes your current clients are holding you back from your ideal clients.

Even if your client is a decent fit and you enjoy the work there may still be a case for firing a client. I learned this when I worked with business writing coach Ed Gandia.

The problem he was helping me solve was increasing my freelance writing revenue without taking on additional clients.

Because I work a day job and have limited time available for freelancing, I had no other option but to raise my rates!

Ed challenged me to go for better-paying clients and as I landed them to let go of my bottom 20 per cent of clients.

This was a big move for me and definitely brought my insecurity to the forefront. In order to charge more you have to believe you’re worth higher fees. And you have to figure out strategies to state your fees with confidence and not buckle when prospects tell you you’re too expensive.

Terrifying!

How did I finally get on board?

I started valuing my time better. I only have a few hours a week I can spend on freelancing so the work I do and the projects I take on have to be worth it. Working on my freelance business means time not doing other things, for example hanging out with my husband.

So I needed to come to terms with a rate that I can feel confident about my choices/priorities.

And part of that coming to terms included identifying which clients were in my bottom 20 per cent and learning how to let them go as I landed better-paying ones.

If you've freelanced for any amount of time you may have considered firing a client at some point. But you've worked hard to land these clients! What gives?

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
If you've freelanced for any amount of time you may have considered firing a client at some point. But you've worked hard to land these clients! What gives?
If you've freelanced for any amount of time you may have considered firing a client at some point. But you've worked hard to land these clients! What gives?