15 Best Apps for Freelance Writers

I opted to do a roundup of best apps for freelance writers because although smartphones allow you to access amazing tools and work on the go, there are so many options.

15 Best Apps for Freelance Writers

How do you know which apps are time savers and which are time wasters?

Here’s my roundup of 15 best apps for freelance writers

I should say right off the bat these are my personal choices, customized for the type of freelance work I do.

So know that when I say “best” this is subjective.

They may not work for you—fair! But if you’re looking for some apps to try out I hope this is an awesome point to help you cut through the overwhelm, maybe save some time testing apps, and get back to your writing!

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Content planning | Best apps for freelance writers

There is so much pre and prep work for freelance writers. If we don’t stay organized we’re doomed! These are my best apps for freelance writers who want to keep their stress levels down and their desks clutter-free.

Trello

I wrote about my love affair with Trello and how it is helping me stick to my blogging content calendar. However, I also use it for my freelance writing.

I create a board for each client and include due dates, assignments, research, etc. and another board for one-off freelance gigs. It’s so much better than flipping through my notebook or digging through email threads trying to remember the focus of an article, when it’s due, or who to send it to.

Basecamp

I didn’t choose Basecamp, Basecamp chose me. This project management software is perfect for teams, so if you’re one of a team of other writers, editors, project managers, designers, developers, etc. you will LOVE this tool.

Each project has it’s own space and to-do items and discussions live within the project so you don’t have to do a lot of emailing (I mean, you can if you want).

I love that you can put your thoughts into the Basecamp project when you have them, then come back to it when you’re working on it and see all your brainstorms, uploads, photos, (whatever!) in once place.

Feedly

Part of my content strategy is sharing useful articles with other freelance writers and also seeing what people in my industry are talking about.

Feedly is how I discover and track content from around the Internet. You set up your lists based on RSS feeds from blogs you want to follow or allow

Feedly to suggest blogs based on keywords. As new posts are available, Feedly pulls them into your feed and you devour them as you have time. You can save articles for later, push them to your social sharing apps, and more.

Editing | Best apps for freelance writers

Even if you’re working with editors you still need your writing to be as clean and correct as possible when submitting work. There are loads of tools you can use but I like to keep my editing simple. These are my best apps for freelance writers to help with editing.

Microsoft Word

For the most part I use Microsoft Word for writing, and I keep my language and grammar checking on with my customized settings but off for auto-correct. Part of my process is to go through my work, reading aloud before submitting.

Hemingway App

This is such a neat tool for helping you rework long, rambling sentences and making stronger word choices. It also helps you change passive voice to active voice (IMPORTANT!), which not only strengthens your writing but also communicates your message better.

Grammarly

Yes. You need to care about grammar. You don’t need to go out and police others’ grammar, but you do need to check your own.

This app helps you find mistakes and improve your writing. Just watch the comma suggestions, I think they’re a bit heavy handed in that area.

Images | Best apps for freelance writers

When I started freelancing I didn’t need to provide my own images, but these days it’s more like 50/50. You don’t need to be a graphic designer to produce high quality images, you just need to know which tools to use. Here are my best apps for freelance writers for creating awesome images.

Canva

The moment I heard about Canva I knew it was for me. It’s a web-based photo editing tool where you can create branded images, beautiful graphics, and more using pre-made templates or designing your own. It’s easy to use—kind of like a scaled-back Photoshop—and allows you to store your brand colours, images, and templates to use over and over.

Pixabay

Can’t take your own photos? Don’t have time to shoot? No problem. This free stock photography site offers more than a million images and videos including illustrations and vector graphics. It’s worth checking out.

If you want more options for free stock photos, here are five great sites to check out.

Brainstorm Ideas for Writing Worksheet

By the way, I may or may not have mentioned I’ve created a collection of helpful worksheets and tip sheets and house them in my resource library. For example, training on brainstorming ideas for writing!

To access this and other resources, pop your email address into the form below and I’ll send you the password.

When you’re in the library, navigate to the Writing category and download the “How to Brainstorm Ideas for Writing Worksheet.

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Social media planning and scheduling | Best apps for freelance writers

I don’t know if you’ll ever get the same answer when asking what someone’s favourite social media tools are. People’s needs and preferences range so much, plus there are always new apps to check out. I’ve tried a LOT of them and will give you my personal best apps for freelance writers who are trying to plan and schedule their social media.

Hashtagger

I wrote about this app when I explained how to find and use hashtags but it’s worth mentioning again here. It’s such a great tool! There are lots of hashtag discovery apps, but this is the one I like for finding popular hashtags around a certain word or phrase when I’m on the go.

As in, I’m in the middle of posting and I need hashtags! The app is minimalist—your only option is to search for hashtags. You do this by typing in a word, pressing search, then selecting the hashtags from the list. You can copy up to 30 then paste them all at once into your post or comment on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+, etc.

NOTE: This app is no longer available in the Canadian iTunes store so I no longer use it but I think it’s still available in the US iTunes store.

Hootsuite

There’s a lot to love about Hootsuite. I used to use it for all my social media but I’m finding it has certain limitations so I’m using a couple new tools, which I’ll outline below. However. I’m still team Hootsuite for all of my Twitter management. I schedule posts, track analytics, and keep an eye on the Twitter lists I follow. It’s easy to organize and keeps me sharp.

Recurpost

This is a new tool in my arsenal but I’m done with my testing and think it’s a keeper. This is a “productivity enhancement tool,” which is a fancy way of saying you can manage your social media for multiple platforms from its dashboard.

In this way it’s a lot like Hootsuite but where it has a leg up is the content library. Here, I can add evergreen posts and create a schedule around the different libraries. What does this mean? I can not only schedule my social media but I can have it repeat on whatever schedule I desire.

I have all my evergreen blogs set up in Recurpost and they now drip out to my chosen social networks on the schedule I set. It is awesome!

Later

Like Hootsuite, this is a social scheduling and planning tool. Unlike Hootsuite, it’s a visual planner. What does this mean? You can plug in your social media posts for the next week, month, whatever, and see how it looks as a collection—this is especially powerful for Instagram.

You can also save images, captions, and hashtags in the tool for easy re-use. Once your post is scheduled it either publishes it for you sends a push notification (on Instagram) when it’s time. I’ve used this tool for the past month or so and so far, I like it.

The visual plan helps me see how each image works together and helps me stay on brand.

File storage | Best apps for freelance writers

If you’re like me, then you’re working on multiple computers, devices, and networks on any given day. What this means is you need everything within easy access. Yes, you can drag your external hard drive around but you can also put everything you need in the cloud. Here are my best apps for freelance writers for working in the cloud.

Google Drive

If you use Google Docs, Forms, and Sheets, then you already know how awesome a partner Google Drive is. You can keep all your documents, images, and whatever else in one web-based place.

You can share documents or folders with the click of a button and you can collaborate on documents with ease, adding comments and track changes as needed.

Dropbox

This is similar to Google Drive but more people use it (at least in my circles). Used more for file sharing than anything else, this is a great way to send huge files back and forth. I use it in my podcast editing work and find it not only easy to use but quick and efficient.

I have multiple Dropbox folders for different reasons and I can customize which folders download to which computer so it stays clean and simple.

LastPass

You need secure passwords and you also need to log into different accounts a zillion times per day on different devices. And, if your day-to-day work is anything like mine, then you’re logging in and out of various client accounts all the day long.

There is NO WAY you’re remembering all those passwords and you are NOT keeping them in your phone or on a notepad. You need them in a password safe.

I love LastPass because I can use it on any computer or device and only need to remember ONE password. All the rest are stored in the password safe and are there when I need them.

Well, that’s my roundup of best apps for freelance writers. Hope you can find something awesome to help make your writing life more efficient.

Do you have any suggestions for best apps for freelance writers? Let me know! I’m always looking for new favourites.

With so many choices, how do you know which apps are time savers and which are time wasters? Here's my roundup of 15 best apps for freelance writers.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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With so many choices, how do you know which apps are time savers and which are time wasters? Here's my roundup of 15 best apps for freelance writers.

How to Write Great and Persuasive Marketing Copy

Writing persuasive marketing copy is both art and science. And takes creativity and skill! But before you get intimidated by the idea of crafting compelling content that motivates people to take action let’s break it down.

How to Write Great and Persuasive Marketing Copy

Engaging copy not only works for inspiring action, but it adds to a great SEO web. The question is, how do you write such great copy?

Solid copywriting can be boiled down to a few basics including style, tone, angle and, of course, target audience.

How to write persuasive marketing copy

Here are a few ways to write start writing persuasive marketing copy.

conversational writing

A big part about writing effective copy is understanding who you’re writing to and connecting with them.

Essentially this means you’re figuring out what you want them to do, what they want to hear and how that message should be delivered.

So, even before your copy begins to take shape, you should have your audience’s persona in mind.

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Copywriting is writing that sells

Here’s the most important thing you need to remember about copy. Copy sells. Anything else is content.

Now, the word “sell” doesn’t always have to mean money, sometimes you’re selling your reader on an idea or a brand or even the hint of a concept.

The point is, there has to be a sell. A call to action. A “buy this,” or “do that,” or “click here.”

Before you begin to write, ask yourself who it is for and what you’re trying to achieve. Once you answer these questions, you can put your copy in the proper perspective and sell it well. That, my friend, is the nuts and bolts of writing persuasive copy.

Persuasive marketing copy Differentiates between benefits and features

When you’re selling something, you often think of the features. However, when you’re buying something you’re looking at the benefits. How will this product or service solve a problem for you? How will it meet a need? When writing copy, think about the reader, your buyer. The best copy knows how to differentiate between benefits and features and keep the main thing the main thing.

Keep it simple

Many early career writers feel like they need to write using big words and formal language so they can impress their readers. The truth? More often than not you end up alienating people that way. Be relatable. Be friendly. Keep it simple.

Writing persuasive marketing copy is both art and science. And takes creativity and skill! But before you get intimidated by the idea of crafting compelling content that motivates people to take action let's break it down.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets (like the worksheet from today’s training!) and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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Dead Easy Ideas For Building a Personal Brand | Simple Tips

One of the trickiest parts about establishing yourself and building a personal brand is actually deciding what that brand will look like.

Building a Personal Brand Tips

Here are a few tips for navigating the process. It’s not comprehensive but hopefully a starting point to start building your brand.

What is a personal brand?

Branding is so, like, vague. Can a colour be a brand? Yes. What about a sound? Sure. How about a particular hat, can that be a brand? Why yes, yes it can.

So…anything can be a brand?

Also, how does this relate to building a personal brand?

Think of your personal brand as an extension of your personality

Online, a personal brand is best represented by something simple yet distinct.

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Here are a few examples:

  • The topics you talk about (stick to a core few and watch your brand explode)
  • Your hobbies (not all of them, but a few relateable nerdy things)
  • The way you do your hair (unique style maybe? Or a memorable streak?)
  • Strong opinions (yeah, drama works)
  • Interesting jewelry or accessories (bright glasses, apron, bling, etc.)

But maybe more important than the look of your persona is the way you make people feel. How do you want to be thought about? And what adjectives would you like people to describe you like?

For example:

  • Helpful
  • Relatable
  • Funny
  • Polarizing
  • Smart
  • Competent
  • Expert
  • Trustworthy
  • Influencer

When thinking through your personal brand try and stick to your actual personality.

If you’re not good with staying organized then don’t bother trying to brand yourself as an on-top-of-things entrepreneur. You’ll be found out one way or another and it will all have been for nothing.

And if you’re an outspoken extrovert maybe avoid acting like you’re demure. It just won’t ring true.

When thinking through building a personal brand remember to be yourself

It can be tempting to take cues from others who have a strong brand when you’re not sure about yours.

And that can be OK at first.

Just be careful not to copy. Being inspired to try something on (a look, an approach a style, whatever) is one thing, but stealing is another.

Aside from the ethical issues, if you are trying to pass something off as yours that isn’t true to you there will be some problems.

  • It won’t fit
  • It won’t ring true
  • People won’t know why but they will be able to tell something’s off

Extra credit: Building Your Brand as a Freelancer

Download this free worksheet on elements of a brand

Download the worksheet that goes with this training

Just pop your email address into the form below and I’ll send you the password for my resource library.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the blogging section and look for the worksheet called “Brand Elements.”

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Building a personal brand

For me, one of the most difficult things about crafting my brand has been trying to figure out which parts of me to highlight and which to leave behind.

Over the years I’ve tried things on, took cues from people I admired, threw spaghetti at the wall and generally struggled to find my laser-focused brand identity.

Part of my problem came from my resistance at narrowing my public persona. What do I cut? What do I keep? And how much do I share? Oh, and how much do I hold back?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach to personal branding. If I’ve learned anything in all of my trial and error it’s this.

Building a personal brand is personal and should be carefully thought through

My brand used to be all over the place because I couldn’t decide which parts of me to share with others and which to keep private.

This all changed when I did a little exercise where I listed the things I was comfortable sharing online, in public, and the things I was not comfortable sharing.

Here’s what I came up with the first time I went through the exercise:

Things I’m comfortable sharing online, on social media

  • Things I like
  • Travelling pictures
  • My gardening
  • What I’m writing

Things I’m not comfortable sharing in public or online

  • Anything about my immediate family
  • About friends who are not colleagues or in my industry
  • My personal relationships

Once I listed out my go/no-go list I immediately stopped feeling pressure to share things about my personal life on social media. Up until this point I didn’t even realize how much internal turmoil I was going through.

Because other influencers were saying this is what I needed to do to build a personal brand. I had to be vulnerable. In order to build authentic relationships I had to put my whole self out on display.

But it didn’t sit right with me. I’m not secretive but I am selective. There are very few people in my every day life who know everything about me so the idea of sharing EVERYTHING online made me sick.

It’s not who I am.

Therefore, it didn’t fit.

So, yeah, people who can share their emotional ups and downs for everyone to see do attract a lot of people to them. And that’s great for them. But I am also confident that approach wouldn’t work for me.

My next concern was worrying that I’m not interesting enough to have a personal brand.

I love blending into the background, helping others get attention and observing from a distance.

Wasn’t working to stand out and draw people to me from my irresistable brand kind of the opposite of my favourite things?

Yeah, kind of.

And I’ve had to work through it. Because I want to be known as a trustworthy source of solid, reliable information I have had to learn to put myself out there and ask for attention.

And for a while, it didn’t fit.

But I’m learning, and I’m growing into it.

Case in point: this interview

Transcript: Robyn Roste | How to Become A Freelance Writer

You can read more about my journey in Platform Building: Smart and Strategic Tips for Writers

Free downloadable tips sheet. Elements of a brand | tips for bulding a personal brand

OK, time for a few quick tips. Remember, you can download these tips from my resource library, just subscribe to my email list and I’ll send you the password.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the blogging section and look for the worksheet called “Brand Elements.”

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Elements of a brand

Branding is an interesting science mixed with art but there are consistent elements. These are all things you’ll need to think about, decide upon, and commit to if you want your branding to be solid.

  • Positioning (what you do and who you serve)
  • Colour palette (in general, like a signature colour)
  • Branded graphics or catchphrase etc.
  • Consistent fonts and image use
  • Voice (like, you need one and it should be distinct)
  • Consistent topics and keywords (whatever you decide you’re comfortable sharing, stick to the list)

Ready to go deeper into branding?

One of the trickiest parts about establishing yourself and building a personal brand is actually deciding what that brand will look like. Here are a few tips for navigating the process. It's not comprehensive but hopefully a starting point to start building your brand.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
One of the trickiest parts about establishing yourself and building a personal brand is actually deciding what that brand will look like. Here are a few tips for navigating the process. It's not comprehensive but hopefully a starting point to start building your brand.

7 Essential Freelance Writer Website Elements

What are the essential freelance writer website elements? If you’re a freelance writer, do you even need a website?

Seven essential freelance writer website elements

Essential freelance writer website elements

Around the Internet I see a lot of advice and tips for author websites but I don’t see much out there to help freelance writers.

Why oh why are we left out? Don’t worry. I’m here to help. Here are seven essential freelance writer website elements. Oh, and three things.

Freelancer Positioning Worksheet

Have you checked out my resource library yet? I have a great training for freelance writers I think will help you sort out what to put on your website!

This exercise is meant to help you break positioning down into four areas: who you best serve (ideal client), what makes you different in the eyes of your ideal client, why that difference matters and what you do.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. Just pop your email into the form below and I’ll send it to you! Once you’re there, navigate to the freelancing section and look for “Freelancing Positioning Worksheet.”

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*back to the training*

First things first, you need it. Every freelance writer needs a website. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

A website is the most critical tool in your freelance writing marketing arsenal. It’s available on-demand, year-round and is the one place you have complete control over what the message is.

You want and need a website. (Which is why we’re going after the freelance writer website elements today.)

Next. There’s a common idea that social networks can replace a website—that’s where your readers and clients are anyway.

But here’s the thing. You don’t own the platform and you can’t control the message. You can add to the conversation, yes. And I think you should be social networking.

However, you don’t want all your eggs in the social media basket. It could go away at any time, and then what?

freelancer website elements

One more thing

Set goals for your website. Yes, I’m talking about S.M.A.R.T. Goals and yes, you need to set some.

  • What’s the primary goal of your website?
  • What do you want people to do when they land on your site?
  • Who do you want to see your writing website?

When you know what your goal is, you will know how to build it to help you achieve your freelance-writing goals.

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Let’s get into it. What are the essential freelance writer website elements?

Less is more here

  1. Clear name. Look at your website. Is your name visible? Anywhere? Make it visible. If you write under a business name you can use that one, but make sure it’s easy to spot and read
  2. About page. This could be called something similar (bio, the company, meet your expert, experience, who I am, my story, profile, ETC.) and it should be on its own web page on your site
  3. Information about your products, services, or portfolio. Or all three. I have lots to say about portfolios (they drive me crazy…they’re out of date so fast in the freelance fast lane!) but I’ll refrain till further notice. Include as many links as you can to recent work and/or merchandise
  4. Social media icons. Do you have a few favourites? (I know I do.) Link to them and give your avid fans a chance to connect with you
  5. Contact page. Yup. You need to let people know how to get in touch with you. How do you want them to contact you? List that information in a clear and visible manner
  6. Email newsletter signup. Even if you don’t have anything to send, start an email list. Do it. You want to keep in touch with people who want to stay in touch with you (by the way, here are some great email marketing tips)
  7. Blog. I mean, I think you should have a blog. But I’ll leave it at the bottom so you know it’s not the first thing you do. Nothing allows your sparkling personality to come through like a blog. I don’t know what it is about the medium, but it WORKS! It serves as your pre-portfolio and helps you improve your writing. Oh, but you do need to keep it updated

Do you have freelance writer website elements to add? I’d love to hear about them!

What should a freelance writer website look like? Why do you even need a website? What are the essential freelance writer website elements anyway?

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
What should a freelance writer website look like? Why do you even need a website? What are the essential freelance writer website elements anyway?
What should a freelance writer website look like? Why do you even need a website? What are the essential freelance writer website elements anyway?

How to Brand Your Blog A Step-by-Step Guide

Want to brand your blog? Here are the things you’ll need to think about, decide upon, and commit to if you want your branding to be solid.

They’re not hard, but you do need to make some choices, which will affect your future. No pressure.

Brand Your Blog A Step-By-Step Guide

Do you want the worksheet that goes with this training?

I’ve created a worksheet to complement this training, available for download. This is a free resource but it’s part of my resource library and you’ll need a password. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Then once you’re in the library, navigate to the blogging section and look for the worksheet called “Brand Elements.”

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Brand your blog: a step-by-step guide

I have blogged for a long time. I don’t know if any of you have followed for the entire journey (like…more than a decade) but if you have you may be aware of a few domain changes, a blog merge, a big old switch from Blogger to WordPress, and then a rebrand.

This is where we are today. Post rebrand.

OK, so there are loads of reasons why I’ve made these decisions along the way. Some strategic, some necessary, some whims but the rebrand was the most important move I made.

The reason?

I needed to. I was a casual lifestyle blogger from start and I wanted to transition into a professional writer. My blog brand (or lack thereof) was holding me back.

Was I doing anything wrong? No. But I needed to make a change.

Elements of a brand

Branding is an interesting science mixed with art but there are consistent elements when you’re looking to brand your blog.

These are all things you’ll need to think about, decide upon, and commit to if you want your branding to be solid.

  • Memorable name (not clever)
  • An easy-to-remember (and spell) URL
  • Tagline (what you do and who you serve)
  • Colour palette
  • Branded graphics (like a logo)
  • Consistent fonts and image use
  • Writing voice
  • Blog topics and keywords
  • Publishing schedule

Elements of a brand free worksheet

Do you want the worksheet that goes with this training?

I’ve created a worksheet to complement this training, available for download. This is a free resource but it’s part of my resource library and you’ll need a password. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Then once you’re in the library navigate to the blogging section and look for the worksheet called “Brand Elements.”

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When I knew I needed a rebrand I put it off for a while. I was overwhelmed. There were so many decisions to make and I didn’t know what the right choices were. Or even if there were right choices. I hummed and hawed over all the details and then I reached a decision: I needed help. So I got help.

I hired a graphic designer who could help me bring my ideas to life. It was a huge relief to have some of the load off my shoulders and once that decision was made, the rebrand happened in a couple months.

Here’s what I outsourced: colour pallet, logo design, font choices, and template design. This allowed me to focus on the foundation of my brand and while I was still part of the process, the load wasn’t so heavy.

This may not be the right decision for you but it was the right one for me.

Why do you want to brand your blog?

A brand lets people know who you are and what you do.

Readers new to your site will only stay if you make it easy. If they have to think then they’ll leave. If they’re confused they’ll leave.

By having a clear brand, readers will know what to expect. If they like what you do, they’ll stick around. They may even subscribe to your email list.

You might not want to brand your blog. You might not have to—it depends what your blogging goals are. Do you have goals? Why are you blogging?

If you need help setting goals, here’s a good place to start.

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And here are a few goal ideas

  • Gain more website traffic
  • Gain more email subscribers
  • Meet and network with other bloggers/influencers
  • Earn revenue
  • Increase personal expertise
  • Increase platform

If it helps, here are a few of my goals

  • First, I want people to think of me as a professional writer
  • I want my website to look and feel professional at a glance
  • By keeping a blog I will demonstrate my writing skills
  • I want my website and blog to get me freelance work.
  • Long-term goals include growing my platform, getting an agent and publishing a book with a traditional publisher

No pressure, right?

What you need to know

Before you brand your blog there are some other things you need to know, unrelated to branding. However, if you don’t know these things then your branding efforts may be in vain.

  • Your target audience
  • What problem are you solving for your target audience?
  • Your blog’s focus (also called a niche…what do you write about?)
  • Your email opt-in (yes you need one)

I know this seems a bit out of order but I know people love jumping into the “fun” stuff first. You know, the logo and colour palette. So I covered them first.

But I hope you understand making these larger, cornerstone decisions are what will allow your brand to communicate to your target audience in the way you intend.

Brand your blog

How it has gone for me

Since my blog rebrand I have grown into the design. It didn’t fit me right away. I felt like it was too flashy and self-important. It took some getting used to it.

I also had to retrain myself to write about my five chosen topics. This was a huge restriction compared to my previous anything goes approach.

So I went slow. And I stalled while battling self-doubt and insecurity.

And then I went for it. I made a plan, I set goals (and spoke them aloud) and I grew into my brand. Is it working?

Well, I’m on the way. I’m sticking to the plan and I’m seeing some results. Do I have a book deal? Still working on it.

Ready to brand your blog? Let me know if you have any questions, I’m happy to help.

Want to brand your blog? Here are the nine things you'll need to think about, decide upon, and commit to if you want your branding to be solid.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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Want to brand your blog? Here are the nine things you'll need to think about, decide upon, and commit to if you want your branding to be solid.
Want to brand your blog? Here are the nine things you'll need to think about, decide upon, and commit to if you want your branding to be solid.