Get More Clients Fast With These 7 Ideas

How do you get more clients fast? This is the ultimate question and when you’re in this position, you don’t have time to try things that “might” work. You need it to work. Now.

get more clients fast

Let’s dive right in: ideas to get more clients fast

Get more clients fast with these seven ideas. I can’t guarantee they’ll work, but they’ve worked for me so at least it’s a starting point.

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1. Reach out to your long-lost clients

This tip only works if you’ve had clients before, but assuming you have this is an excellent place to start. If you haven’t worked with a client for a couple months you can classify them as “cold” and they qualify for this tactic. Go through your cold clients and send them an email asking how their project/magazine/website/etc. is going and if there’s anything you can help them with.

If you had positive experiences with clients in the past and they didn’t call you back for more, it may not be because they don’t like you or don’t have work. Sometimes they’re too busy to reach out…sometimes they don’t think of you…and sometimes they have a project but haven’t got to letting you know about it yet.

Do it!

Extra reading: Overcome the Fear of Marketing Yourself

2. Ask for referrals

Sometimes this can feel awkward but when you need clients it’s time to get over it and as for referrals. Ask your current clients if they have any colleagues who could use your services. Tell them you’re looking to add a few more clients to your roster. Either they’ll tell you they don’t know anyone, they’ll give you a couple leads or they’ll give you more work themselves. THIS WORKS!

Extra Reading: Want to Work from Home? Consider Freelance Writing!

3. Tell your network you’re open for business

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, the best way to let people know you’re available is by saying you’re available. Mine your friends and family list for leads. Remember, you NEED clients NOW. You’re in a spot. Lay it out in an interesting, polite way so it’s easy for them to think of you when they hear about someone looking for a writer.

4. Run an ad

I have a friend who does this and swears by it. Whenever she’s looking for a couple more clients she runs a Facebook ad for a week or two to a super-duper targeted audience and gets her money back tenfold. You have to know what you’re doing, and target the right audience, but this can and does work.

If you do want to run ads as part of your prospecting strategy, make sure your pricing includes that overhead!

For extra help on the subject, I co-created the course How to Price Your Work. Setting your prices takes a bit of effort and guts but it will help you stay away from jobs that don’t pay enough. So you can make a living from your craft!

5. Apply to job board postings

Yes there are horror stories from job boards. Yes I would say you don’t get the strongest clients from job boards. However, you’re in a situation where you need clients now and job boards are filled with businesses looking for people just like you. You’ll have to look hard and put out a lot of inquiries but you’ll find clients.

Here are a few suggestions for job boards I’ve found good.

Extra reading: How to Find Great Freelance Writing Jobs

This next one is going to blow your mind.

6. Do a Twitter search

Using a Twitter search (or browse my helpful Twitter list for Writing Jobs) you’ll find real-time tweets from businesses looking for writers. Here are a few hashtag searches you can try.

  • #writerwanted
  • #ghostwriter
  • #hiring #writer
  • #writingcommunity
  • #journalismjobs
  • #writingjobs
  • #remotejobs
  • #freelancejobs

I’ve connected with quite a few awesome clients through Twitter so I’m a fan of this one to say the least!

Extra reading: Get Noticed by Influencers on Twitter Using Lists

7. Write guest posts

I should qualify this with write paid guest posts. Writing free ones is a good long-term strategy but doesn’t work when you need clients now. Different goals.

There are lots of websites and blogs that pay for content although there’s no set rate. But if you need cash flow…this is one way to get ‘er done. You’ll have to do the pitching so get ready to hustle.

Extra reading: Content Marketing Ideas to Keep Your Prospect Funnel Full

So? Did you get some great new ideas to get clients fast?

These are emergency strategies for when you’re in panic mode and need clients quick. Even people with the best referral programs and ongoing marketing strategies run into this from time-to-time (but…not as much).

While these are all effective I encourage you not to try them all at once. You will burn out! Too much hustle is unsustainable. Plus you’ll be hustling so much you may not find time to do the work!


Get more clients fast with these seven ideas. I can't guarantee they'll work, but they've worked for me so at least it's a starting point.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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Get more clients fast with these seven ideas. I can't guarantee they'll work, but they've worked for me so at least it's a starting point.
How do you get more clients fast? This is the ultimate question and when you're in this position, you don't have time to try things that "might" work. You need it to work. Now.

How to Help Your Team Become Better Writers

As writers, we take responsibility for continually improving our craft. But what about other people? Do we have a responsibility to help them become better writers?

How to Help Your Team Become Better Writers (Three Ideas)

It depends.

Anyone can learn writing, it’s a skilll and with enough training and practice, most people can get by. But the majority of non-writers it would seem take this skill for granted. They assume since everyone can do it, it’s not a big deal.

And here’s where they’re so, so wrong. Iiin fact, there are terrifying studies looking into the decline of writing skills that indicate this could become a serious issue in the workplace if the downward trend continues.

Great for freelance writers though. Just saying.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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How to help your team become better writers

Anyway, today we’re talking about helping our non-writing teammates become better writers. Why would we invest like this? There are a few reasons.

For example, if you collaborate with a graphic designer it’s super helpful if they know and understand writing and have the skills to empower you to do your best work. They’ll help identify opportunities to tweak and improve your copy and point out typos.

Another example is if you work with a customer service team that doesn’t appreciate the importance of writing, then good luck trying to convince them to use scripts or stay on message! They won’t see the point and would prefer to wing it…which definitely can go sideways. All of a sudden a healthy regard for writing is looking pretty important!

But let’s say you work on a team that respects your skills and expertise and wants to learn from you. Here are a few suggestions to help them improve in their writing.

Review the latest best practices

Writing and language evolves. The rules shift. Let’s collectively let go of the old ways and move into the new with precision and grace. But wait, how can your workplace follow writing best practices unless they have a style guide from whence to grow and change?

First things first, get a style guide to follow, then keep it updated. And work on other high-level documents that take forever but are worth their weight in gold: communications strategy, communications plan, marketing strategy, marketing plan, digital strategy, etc. etc. Through this process you’ll settle on your organization’s style, tone, audience and MORE.

By the way, once you have all this in place now you’re ready to bring in the best SEO company to review your web presence and create recommendations and strategies to help you bring everything to the next level. While SEO involves lots of back-end, technical work, there is also a ton of writing opportunity so don’t shy away from SEO!

Offer professional training 

There are many ways to help your team become better writers and professional training is a wonderful short cut. Whether you invest in online courses or sending team members to workshops or conferences, learning from another professional can be a great way to upskill without going back to school for an entire degree.

For team building you could even bring in a speaker and spend the day learning together. These sorts of experiences can be fun compared to other types of training, depending on your team’s availability, interest and personalities of course!

Implement tools to become better writers

There are SO many helpful writing tools you can use to help your team (and yourself) become better writers. You don’t need to memorize all the rules! Explore some of the latest online writing tools and see how they could benefit your team.

When it comes to business, words matter. First impressions last. And if the way potential customers notice you is because of poor writing, this could linger in their minds like a bad smell.

Helping non-writers become better writers may seem counter-intuitive but if they’re your co-workers, it will help your business and it will help you. If you can get them to a level where they can be trusted to use language well that takes some pressure off of you so you can focus on doing what you do best.

Helping non-writers become better writers may seem counter-intuitive but if they're your co-workers, it will help your business and it will help you. If you can get them to a level where they can be trusted to use language well that takes some pressure off of you so you can focus on doing what you do best.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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How to Find Great Freelance Writing Jobs

When you’re a new freelancer, finding freelance writing jobs may seem like an overwhelming task. And I understand how finding a gig—any gig—can feel a bit like luck.

How to Find Great Freelance Writing Jobs

Where do you even start looking? And when you find someone looking for a writer, how do you know the job is any good?

The good news and the bad news about online freelance writing jobs

OK, here it is. The good news is, when you Google “freelance writing jobs” you’ll find a lot of postings.

The bad news is, when you you’ll also find a lot of low-paying postings and straight up bad gigs.

Learning to tell the difference is an important part about finding success as a freelance writer.

Finding gigs that pay what you need is another important part.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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How to discern a good freelance writing job from a bad one

The first thing to keep in mind is “good” and “bad” gigs are subjective. You need to know ahead of time what kind of job you’re looking for and what type of client will suit your needs.

If you’re new to the freelance world you may not know this yet and will learn through trial and error. That’s OK! But take a few minutes to think about the types of freelance writing jobs you’d like to have.

  • Writing blog posts and articles?
  • Media releases?
  • Business profiles?
  • Journalism?

Think it through and write it down

After you know what type of writing you want to do take a few minutes to figure out who your ideal client is.

  • Are you looking for someone who is hands off?
  • Someone to collaborate with?
  • Do you want to be able to meet in person?
  • Do you want one-off clients or ones you have an ongoing relationship with?

There are no wrong answers here, just what’s right for you. Knowing what types of clients you’d like will help you avoid overwhelm as you comb through the vast array of freelance writing jobs out there.

It will also keep you from applying for gigs that aren’t a good fit for you.

Extra Credit: Platform Building: Smart and Strategic Tips for Writers

Bonus tip: keep a close eye on how the job postings are written. If you see phrases like “looking for hungry writers,” or a value attributed to the quantity of articles they’re looking for rather than quality of writing, these should trigger warning bells in your head.

These gigs are often low paying (pennies per word, if that) and demanding. Even if you don’t have much experience yet, you can do better.

How to figure out what you need to earn as a freelance writer

Even though many writers aren’t numbers people, it’s important to learn how to budget so you know how much income you need in order to reach your goals.

Do a bit of number crunching and determine what you need per month to get by.

Also figure out how much time you have to dedicate to your freelancing. From here you’ll have a good idea of how many clients you can take on and how much you need from each one.


If you’re wondering how to set your prices, I think you’ll like the course I co-created, How to Price Your Work. Setting your prices takes a bit of effort and guts but it will help you stay away from jobs that don’t pay enough. So you can make a living from your craft!

When you look at online postings you may feel like you have to lower your prices or standards in order to get work.

Don’t give up!

There are great freelance writing jobs out there but sometimes you have to know where to look.

Where I look for great freelance writing jobs

I encourage writers to think outside of the box when looking for work. Even when you need to get clients fast you shouldn’t lower your standards.

The main ways I find work are from referrals, networking with other writers and Twitter (really!).

There’s always someone looking for a writer but people have to know you’re a writer in order for them to think of you and reach out.

Job boards are a great starting point for freelancers who don’t have established networks. The good gigs are scooped up quick so if this is your go-to then you will need to check often and apply a lot.

It’s a numbers game so don’t become discouraged if you don’t hear back from many or most of the places you pitch.

Here are a few suggestions for job boards I’ve found good.

Parting words: I’ve learned it’s important to keep looking for freelance work even if you have a full client load. Developing strategies to keep the marketing machine going during busy times ensures you won’t have so many dry spells. And the better your clients are, the less you’ll need in order to reach your financial goals.


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When you're a new freelancer, finding freelance writing jobs may seem like an overwhelming task. And I understand how finding a gig—any gig—can feel a bit like luck. Where do you even start looking? And when you find someone looking for a writer, how do you know the job is any good?

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
When you're a new freelancer, finding freelance writing jobs may seem like an overwhelming task. And I understand how finding a gig—any gig—can feel a bit like luck. Where do you even start looking? And when you find someone looking for a writer, how do you know the job is any good?
When you are a new freelancer, finding freelance writing jobs may seem like an overwhelming task. And I get how finding a gig can feel a bit like luck.

9+ Non-Fiction Genres that Are Actually Really Different

There are many non-fiction genres but people don’t give it too much thought at first. I guess it’s because the genre breakdowns aren’t as exciting as fiction. Even still, I think they’re pretty cool!

What are the Different Non-Fiction Genres? (Nonfiction?)

Whether or not it’s nonfiction or non-fiction (can someone help me? I really don’t know), if you want to publish a not fiction book it’s important to understand at least the basic breakdown of the genre.

Non-fiction genres

Let’s start with a big list of common non-fiction genres. Ones you’ve probably already thought of.

  • Journalism
  • Essay
  • Biography
  • Memoir
  • Science
  • Technical
  • Opinion (also called op-ed)
  • History

You still with me? Straightforward, ish.

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But maybe you’re wondering why genre matters, why we’re talking about it at all.

If you want to be a freelance writer, knowing the difference between non-fiction genres will be a great asset!

First reason: you will know what type of writing you do (I write bios or I write history, for example).

Second reason: you will know what types of publications to pitch your writing to. If you write op-eds, for example, you’ll go to publications that publish op-eds. Not everyone does so it pays to know this before you pitch!

Third reason: if you’re thinking of writing a book one day, word count changes based on your genre. Yes, in non-fiction genres too! Understanding what you’re writing will make all the difference.

What are the Different Non-Fiction Genres?

Don’t worry, we can go deeper

Once you dive into the wonderful world of non-fiction writing you can get into the nuance of the craft.

Going deeper and refining your writing style by genre makes you a stronger all-around writer. It also allows you to offer more specialized services to your clients.

And, thus, charge more for your expertise.

Here are a few more examples to get your wheels turning. For the complete list head on over to Wikipedia.

  • Creative nonfiction
  • Dictionary/Encyclopedia/Thesaurus
  • Textbook
  • Theology
  • Philosophy
  • Handbook/Guide/Manual
  • Letter
  • Literary criticism
  • Academic

Yes these are all legitimate genres and ways you can write for money. So think big, think outside the standardized package and lean into your natural strengths.

Extra reading: What is Prescriptive Non-Fiction?

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There are many non-fiction genres but people don't give it too much thought at first. I guess it's because the genre breakdowns aren't as exciting as fiction. Even still, I think they're pretty cool!

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
There are many non-fiction genres but people don't give it too much thought at first. I guess it's because the genre breakdowns aren't as exciting as fiction. Even still, I think they're pretty cool!

How to Write a Case Study

If you know how to tell a story you can write a case study.

How to Write a Case Study

However, if you’ve never done it before you might be wondering how to write a case study. So here we go.

By the way, a case study is a success story told about a client you’ve helped. Simple, right?

Free ebook: How to write a case study: gain trust with prospects by showcasing your client's success

Do you want the ebook that goes with this training? I’ve created a PDF download and it’s available in my resource library.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re logged in, navigate to the writing section and look for “How to Write a Case Study for Marketing Ebook.”

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How to write a case study

Maybe before I get into how to write a case study I’ll talk about what makes something a case study.

In essence, it’s a study analysis where you overview a business problem, outline options for solving the problem and what happened in the end.

The fact that you’re telling your client’s story from beginning to end, and including twists and turns along the way, makes this different than an advertisement or a sales page because you’re keeping the twists and turns in the story.

The fact that it’s not just “I decided to do this thing and then it worked and now I’m successful yayyyyy,” makes it a case to study. Case study. Right!?

Something to keep in mind is although this isn’t a traditional sales page, a case study is a tool in your sales and marketing arsenal.

It’s something you want prospective clients to read and become convinced to hire you. So make sure it’s targeted to people who are on the fence about working with you and tell client success stories that will help them see how you’ll help them reach their goals.

Free ebook: Gain trust with prospects by showcasing your client's success.

Download the ebook that goes with this training!

This is a free resource but it’s in my resource library, which requires a password. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re logged in, navigate to the writing section and look for “How to Write a Case Study for Marketing Ebook.”

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What to include in a case study

Here are a few sections to include:

Case study introduction

In one or two sentences present your reader with the problem or issue and a quick summary of the outcome.

Background

Think of this section like setting the scene. You don’t want to spend too much time here but your reader should learn what has brought your client to this point in his or her business.

Alternatives

I know this might seem like overkill but you want to list ideas you or your clients entertained/tried in order to build your narrative arc.

Overview what alternative solutions you considered and explain why they wouldn’t/couldn’t work or were not possible.

Proposed solution

This is your moment! Highlight your one and only amazing solution to your client’s problem or issue.

Make sure it’s relevant, specific and realistic, explain why you chose it and support your solution with evidence.

Your evidence can contain research, anecdotes or both.

case study elements

Case study recommendations

Here you’ll overview the steps you took to accomplish your proposed solution. This should be specific, strategic and relevant (are you sensing a theme?).

When writing a case study make sure you tell it from beginning to end, following this outline as much as possible.

Use as much data as you need to frame your point but keep your reading in mind—too much data = dry and boring. Don’t be dry and boring.

A case study doesn’t have to feel like a case study—your reader doesn’t even have to realize they’re reading one.

If you share a client’s success story from start to finish in a compelling way and help potential clients decide to do business with you, then your case study has done its job.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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The question of how to write a case study is a great one. But maybe you're wondering what a case study is and why you should care about it. I get that.

Want this case study training as a PDF? Download the ebook in my resource library.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

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The question of how to write a case study is a great one. But maybe you're wondering what a case study is and why you should care about it. I get that.
The question of how to write a case study is a great one. But maybe you're wondering what a case study is and why you should care about it. I get that.