The Best 7 Health Tips for Writers to Help You Write More

This quick list of health tips for writers is the result of an instrumental change I made, which has made a huge difference in my life and career.

Health Tips for Writers

I reached a point in my writing life where I realized being good at writing wasn’t going to be enough to have a substantial career if I wasn’t healthy enough to sit at the computer to, you know, write all day.

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Health tips for writers

If you’re anything like me you spend a lot of time sitting in front of your computer.

And, if you’re anything like me, living this sedentary writer lifestyle can lead to some unwanted health issues like weight gain, headaches, eye pain, joint/back pain and more.

For a long time I thought I had a pretty active lifestyle—until I got a Fitbit and learned the harsh truth. I learned I didn’t move much at all and after a few months of denial (the activity tracker must not be tracking all my movement) I decided to do something about it.

Because…well, the writing was on the wall. I had gained weight, I was tired all the time, my back and neck had chronic pain and I was overall miserable.

I had a feeling I was on the fast track for something much worse health-wise.

So I decided to make some changes. This was about a year ago and I’ve seen nothing but positive results after implementing a healthier routine.

And yes, by getting up at 4:30 a.m. for 21 days did in fact inspire this. I learned if I can do that, I can do anything.

Tips for beating writers block. Free download

Fighting writer’s block? Here are five super tips to break free.

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Once you’re there, navigate to the “writing” section and look for “Tips for Beating Writer’s Block.”

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Here are my top tips

Take a screen break every 60 minutes

The Fitbit makes it easy because it buzzes every hour and reminds me to get moving.

And, I’ve learned, if I get up and move every hour—walk around, have a stretch, whatever—I am pretty productive.

It makes it easy for me to push hard on my work because I know I get to take a quick break soon. It has been a great habit to pick up! Plus I hear not looking at a screen all day is good for you or something.

Get outside

Halfway through my workday I take a walk. I used to think this was such a waste of work time but I’ve learned the exercise combined with the fresh air (and lack of screen time) acts as a reset.

It renews my energy and I return to my desk full of ideas. My walks last for about 15 minutes and I find it’s an excellent length.

P-O-S-T-U-R-E

Yes, sitting with proper posture has been something I’ve worked on as is making a big difference to my back and neck. As in, I don’t have such issues with pain.

Which allows me to focus and concentrate on my work. Of course I have moments where I slip back into slouching and hunching but as soon as I realize it I adjust. And it’s working.

Snacks should be vegetables

Ugh I know! But if you’re wondering where that sneaky 10 pounds came from take a good look at your snack cupboard. I’m making a deliberate effort to have more vegetables in my life and it’s making a difference.

Hydrate. All day, e’ry day

I’ve loved coffee for a long time but as I changed up my nutrition habits I realized my relationship with coffee had to change.

Our relationship had to change. Like, we could see each other but water became the primary liquid in my life.

Staying hydrated helps me stay focused and clear-headed. And I don’t seem to have many headaches anymore.

Have a strong morning routine

I think this is the most important of my health tips for writers because this is where everything started for me.

I get out of bed and tackle the things most important to me first, before I do anything else. This helps me set up my day for success. I’m so glad I found something that works.

It helps me arrive at work with a clear head, ready to dive into the day.

Exercise first thing in the morning

Speaking of morning routines, allow me to suggest adding exercise to it. Working out first thing isn’t easy but it makes a remarkable difference to the rest of your day.

I used to try and hit the gym after work but there were so many times where other plans or meetings came up or I found convenient excuses to skip out.

Adding exercise into my morning routine means it’s something I do—not something I think about doing or debate about doing.

So those are my health tips for writers. Walk around, drink lots of water, get outside, build an awesome morning routine. You know, do healthy things!

Author Joanna Penn published a book on this topic as well, so if you’re looking for a deep dive on building a healthy writing lifestyle check out The Healthy Writer: Reduce Your Pain, Improve Your Health, And Build A Writing Career For The Long Term.

This quick list of health tips for writers is the result of an instrumental change I made, which has made a huge difference in my life and career. 

I reached a point in my writing life where I realized being good at writing wasn't going to be enough to have a substantial career if I wasn't healthy enough to sit at the computer to, you know, write all day.

One more thing. I think you’ll like my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

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health tips for writers

This quick list of health tips for writers is the result of an instrumental change I made, which has made a huge difference in my life and career. 

I reached a point in my writing life where I realized being good at writing wasn't going to be enough to have a substantial career if I wasn't healthy enough to sit at the computer to, you know, write all day.
If you're anything like me you spend a lot of time sitting in front of your computer. Here are some health tips for writers I hope you will find helpful.

How to Choose a Writers Group

Before you can choose a writers group you have to have some idea of what you’re looking for and what you need. Once you know what you’re looking for from freelance writing groups, here are a few ways to tell if the group is a good writers group.

How to Choose a Writers Group

How to choose a writers group

When I first started considering being a freelance writer I remember thinking…now what?

I didn’t know where to start, who to talk to or how it all worked.

Of course I Googled things but without a mentor to point me in the right direction I felt overwhelmed and paralyzed.

After stumbling around for a while I met a freelance writer in person and she introduced me to a local writers group. I remember thinking…THIS is what I need! And you know what? It was.

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Now that I’ve been around this world for a while I know there’s a lot of people on the Internet who advocate against writers groups.

And their reasons are fair.

  • If you get a bad group it can be a terrible waste of time and energy
  • This risk of a not-good-fit group is feeling unwelcome and competitive
  • And if you’re in a group of people who aren’t there to be helpful, it can be a disheartening and negative experience
Your Writer's Statement Free Fillable Worksheet

By the way, if you can get clear on why you’re writing, everything will become MUCH easier because you’re focused on your why.

I have created a worksheet to help—this is a free download but you’ll need a password to access it in my resource library. Just pop your email address into the form below and I’ll send you the password!

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the writing section and look for “Create a Writer’s Statement Worksheet.”

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But what if you get the right group?

Well! Now we’re talking. If you’re in a good writers group you’ll benefit from SO MANY THINGS!

Reasons to join a good writers group

  • You get out of your own head
  • There’s (instant) helpful and constructive feedback
  • You have others who believe in you and your work even when you don’t
  • You meet other writers
  • There’s a chance you’ll hone your craft
  • Motivation
  • Accountability
  • And, if you’re lucky, you may even find a mentor

OK so I’ve convinced you to join a writers group. Great. Now for the next important question: HOW. How do you choose a writers group?

How to choose a (good) writers group

Before you can choose between freelance writing groups, you have to have some idea of what you’re looking for and what you need.

You should know what type of writing you do, how much commitment you can make, what type of writers group you’re looking for (there are many kinds of writers groups: critique groups, mentorship groups, professional groups, genre-defined groups, non-fiction groups, freelance groups…etc.), and how formal you want the group to be.

Once you know those things, here are a few ways to tell if the group is a good writers group.

Questions to ask

  • Does the group have a clear and defined goal?

This doesn’t have to be engraved on a plaque but it does need to exist. If a group doesn’t know why they’re meeting it’s like a book club without a book…what’s the point?

  • Does the group have the same writing interests as you?

You want to make sure your writing interests are aligned. While it’s great to know writers from all sorts of genres, a writers group should have a bit more in common. If you’re a poet, find a poets group. If you’re a freelance writer, find a freelance writers group (here’s an example from my life, proof that good writing groups exist).

  • Do the members in the writers group write more than they talk about writing?

Writers write. Keep that in mind. Yes it’s good and important to socialize with other writers but a writers group should be filled with people who are writing and it should motivate you to do the same.

  • Is the group committed to kind and constructive feedback?

This has to be a safe space. You have to feel comfortable sharing your work with likeminded people and if you encounter writers who are harsh or cruel then this isn’t the kind of group you want to be in.

There’s a difference between ripping someone to shreds and offering helpful critique. New writers are more sensitive and don’t take criticism well, even if it’s well-intended.

Make sure the group remembers what it was like to be new and not used to receiving criticism.

And the most important question.

  • Do the members get along?

If the writers group has behaviour guidelines—even better! If you check out a writers group meeting and there’s bickering or snide remarks or shaming then this isn’t a good sign.

Maybe there’s a bad egg and he or she needs to be removed from the group—ask the leaders what their behaviour policy is and don’t join a group where people don’t get along.

Of course no group is perfect and there are always moments where someone steps out of line or someone’s feelings get hurt. This is a part of being human.

But if overall a writers group aims to meet these points then it is probably a good group.

And I will also mention these groups aren’t always in person—there are virtual writers groups and critique groups that work better for some than in-person meetings do.

Before you can choose a writers group you have to have some idea of what you need. Here are a few ways to tell if it's a good group.

Where to find writers groups

Here are a few ideas for places to look when you’re ready to join a writers group.

Online. You can Google or search for “local writers groups” on Meetup and see what comes up.

I’ve found groups this way and met a lot of interesting people through attending random local events I found online. You can do the same type of search on social media. I’ve joined lots of writers groups on Facebook and have found a couple I’m getting a lot out of

Writing associations. I’m part of a professional writing association (PWAC, now the Canadian Freelance Guild) and they have chapters all over Canada.

I joined my local chapter and find a lot of value from my relationships with the other professional writers in the group

People you know. I mentioned how I met a local writer and she connected me with a writers group. I was so starved for connection and direction I couldn’t wait to go.

Meeting other writers was so important to my development as a writer. I don’t know where I would be if I hadn’t met such wonderful mentors

Writers conferences. Yes! Going to a writers conference is huge in itself but if you can maintain relationships with a few of the writers you meet there, even better!

Join an existing group or start your own. It’s a great option.

Are you ready to join a writers group?

Sometimes it feels like a lot of effort to connect with other writers and when you’re an introverted writer (as so many of us are) it can be that much tougher.

I attend writers groups to stay connected and socialized as well as offer encouragement and support to the writers who I receive encouragement and support from. If you can find a good writers group I know you’ll understand why I recommend it!

Why not give it a try?

Before you can choose a writers group you have to have some idea of what you need. Here are a few ways to tell if it's a good group.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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Before you can choose a writers group you have to have some idea of what you need. Here are a few ways to tell if it's a good group.
Before you can choose a writers group you have to have some idea of what you need. Here are a few ways to tell if it's a good group.

How to Write an Elevator Pitch

The phrase “elevator pitch” in a freelancing or writing context comes from the idea of communicating what you do, who you serve and what makes you different in the time it takes to ride from floor to floor in an elevator.

An elevator pitch is a short, compelling sales pitch.

How to Write an Elevator Pitch

Do you want the worksheets that go with this training?

I’ve added the two elevator pitch templates from this post as a free download to my resource library. This is a freebie you’ll need a password to access the library itself. You can get the password by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the “freelancing” section and look for “Elevator Pitch Templates.”

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How to write an elevator pitch

We know how our writing can help others but our potential clients don’t. If they did they probably wouldn’t need a writer. It’s a classic conundrum.

We can get so wrapped up in our writing world we forget that those not in our world have no idea what we do or why it matters. It’s our job to educate them.

This is where the elevator pitch comes in.

  • I know, how can you explain all the facets of your writing business in a way that both makes sense and persuades someone to hire you?
  • How can you craft a pitch that not only positions you as an expert but convinces the listener you’re the right person to deliver the solution he or she wants?
  • (Yes, this is the hard part.)

Telling people “I’m a writer,” is great but it’s vague. What do you write? How do you make money? Who reads what you write?

See what I mean?

  • Think about what you do and then expand your definition to include someone who has no clue about your industry
  • Think of your grandmother or someone in an unrelated field
  • How would you describe the service you provide to them?
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Break it down

Before we write the pitch let’s answer these questions:

  • Who do you help (in an ideal world)
  • What problem are you solving
  • What is your solution?

Who do you help?

When I first went through this process I realized I couldn’t be a generalist and “help everyone with their writing stuff.”

I needed to zero in on an audience/group. It took some soul searching, but I recognized I had a passion for helping new/emerging writers learn how to make money from their writing and helping established writers market themselves.

Yeah, I know. Specific. Scary stuff, right?

Except it’s not scary. It doesn’t mean I can’t help non-writers with writing (I do it all the time), it just means I have an ideal client who I focus on the most.

In the end I found the easiest way to write an elevator pitch was by filling in the blank. Here are two formulas I found helpful.

networking tips for introverted writers

Free elevator pitch templates

I’ve added the two elevator pitch templates from this post as a free download to my resource library. This is a freebie you’ll need a password to access the library itself. You can get the password by popping your email address into the form below.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the “freelancing” section and download “Elevator Pitch Templates.”

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How to write an elevator pitch example ONE

The biggest problem my audience has is _________________ and I can solve this problem by (showing them, giving them, etc.) ___________________, which will allow them to ________________ and that really speaks to their desire to ________________.

I found this over on Zach Spuckler’s site in a freebie called Your First Course Playbook. I have no idea if it’s still kicking around but I thought it was a good exercise.

How to write an elevator pitch example TWO

I help _________________ (target population) with/gain/develop _________________ (problem) by delivering _________________ (your solution).

This is from a six-week coaching program I did last summer called Simplify Your Social Media and Spark Your Sales. It isn’t offered anymore but if it ever is again I will let you know.

I LOVED every second of it and ran through it a few times after the initial course. I like how simple this sentence is. It helped me narrow my gaze enough to commit to an elevator pitch.


networking tips for introverted writers

Do you want the worksheets that go with this training?

I’ve added the two elevator pitch templates from this post as a free download to my resource library. This is a freebie you’ll need a password to access the library itself. You can get the password by popping your email address into the form below.

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Other Helpful Articles

The phrase "elevator pitch" came from explaining what you do, who you serve and what makes you different in the time it would take to ride an elevator.

One more thing. You may be interested in my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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The phrase "elevator pitch" came from explaining what you do, who you serve and what makes you different in the time it would take to ride an elevator.
Elevator speech. Elevator statement. Elevator pitch. Why are we on an elevator all the time? The phrase came from the idea you need to figure out a way to explain what you do, who you serve, and what makes you different in the time it would take to ride an elevator. It's a short, compelling sales pitch. So, how do you write an elevator pitch?

How to Effectively Market Your Services to Boost Freelance Success

A common complaint I hear from freelancers is they’re so busy working in their business they struggle to find time to work in their business. Maybe you’re in this position now, you’re busy working and you’re wondering how to market your services to take things to the next level.

A common complaint I hear from freelancers is they're so busy working in their business they struggle to find time to work in their business. Maybe you're in this position now, you're busy working and you're wondering how to market your services to take things to the next level.

Let me paint a picture. You’ve been running your business for a while, getting paid for your services and you’ve also built a portfolio you’re proud of.

And while you like the work, you’d like to explore what steps you can take to push your success further. And make more profit.

When you reach this point (or rather, plateau), you may feel like taking things to the next level is some sort of mystery only the REALLY good freelancers solve. But once you understand the steps you need to take to grow your business, you realize it’s simpler than it seems. 

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How to market your services to boost your freelance business

When it comes to marketing your freelance business, there are a lot of simple routes that you can take to find success.

Believe it or not, marketing your business isn’t rocket science. It’s simply a case of knowing what steps you need to take to see results. That, of course, is unique to you and your business so it may take some trial and error. But rest assured, you’ll find your secret sauce.

No really! You will! 

Bearing that in mind, here are three quick ways you can market your services to make growing your freelance business a little easier.

Use social media Effectively 

When used properly, social media marketing can be an effective way to grow your brand and your business.

If you’re keen to use social media, then optimizing your platforms and using them consistently with on-brand messages is a great place to start. Figure out your content marketing mix and you’re on your way!

Like I always say, one of the best ways to find work when you’re looking for work is to tell people. Get the word out about your services. 

Extra credit: Simpe 5 Step Social Media Strategy for Writers

Consult an expert

If you’re feeling unsure of what strategic steps you should take to boost your biz, then hiring a coach is an excellent step. Find someone who has experience in your specific niche or area, and also make sure you connect with them and their teaching style.

Coaching isn’t cheap but if you find the right person then you will get that money back quickly with all you learn and apply.

Freelancers can fall into the trap of thinking they have to do everything themselves. But the truth is, no one is an island. Ask for help from those who have gone before you, or are at least a few steps ahead.

You might be surprised by the type of marketing tactics that are recommended to you to try, such as Allvision Billboards for example. Experts are able to see a path that is still hidden from your view.

Utilise testimonials to market your services

There are so many solopreneurs and side hustlers these days. And often, prospects want some assurance that the small business or freelancer they’re considering is reliable, trustworthy and skilled. That’s where testimonials come in.

One of the best ways to give potential clients assurance that you are, in fact, a good bet, having testimonials from previous clients can be important and useful in snagging that business. 

Of course these are just three simple suggestions to market your services to showcase just how easy marketing can be. So the next time you find yourself saying you’re too busy to market, give your head a shake and go put up another client testimony on your website.

A common complaint I hear from freelancers is they're so busy working in their business they struggle to find time to work in their business. Maybe you're in this position now, you're busy working and you're wondering how to market your services to take things to the next level.

One more thing. I think you’ll enjoy my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

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Facebook Group Tips | 5 Tips for Avoiding the Drama

These Facebook Group tips will help you network without going down the drama rabbit hole. Why would you want to participate in groups?

Facebook Group Tips | Avoiding the Drama

They’re an interesting ecosystem within the social media behemoth.

For example, many successful Facebook Groups provide small, safe spaces for like-minded individuals to connect. And many groups have the added benefit of being secret or private, so your group activities aren’t revealed to your friends or followers.

Would you like free writing tips? Sign up for my weekly tips & tricks, from one writer to another at robynroste.com/writing-tips.
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Facebook Group tips

Networking is a critical aspect of success in the freelance writing world. Because many writers are also introverts, the idea of networking can seem either overwhelming or needless.

But those who have joined healthy writing groups, they understand the power of networking and collaborating with likeminded people. In this, you discover your tribe and realize you’re not so alone after all.

See also: Networking Tips for Introverted Writers

While in-person groups can be amazing, the isolated nature of the writing life doesn’t always support regular attendance.

That’s where online networking comes in. With more than a billion active users, Facebook is an easy place to find community and networking opportunities. But if you’ve joined groups before, you may understand their potential volatility.

These Facebook Groups tips are intended to help freelance writers make the most out of networking while avoiding the drama.

Groups versus pages

Before we get into the Facebook Group tips let’s do a quick overview of the difference between groups and pages.

If you have a business people assume you have a Facebook Page. This is a convenience for the general public and can function, in its simplest form, as a business card directing prospects to your website or informing them of how to contact you.

Page owners can leverage their pages and use them like a community but this takes a lot of effort and dedication, which is why groups may be a better option for interacting with your followers and fans.

Having a Facebook Page is also required if you want to run Facebook ads, which is something to consider if you’re ready to invest in online prospecting. But we’ll get to that another time.

A Facebook Group is less linear than a page and the group members can have the ability to create content and carry on discussions without the administrator’s approval.

Author Kirsten Oliphant describes groups as “a web, where connections don’t have to move in a linear way from the creator at the center.”

Groups can be about anything (a person, a topic, a website, whatever) and, for many, are an important connection hub for a writer’s networking efforts.

5 Tips for Optimizing Your Social Media Profiles Free Ebook

While we’re talking about social media, I wanted you to know about my free ebook outlining five easy ways to optimize your social media profiles.

You can read the post Five Tips for Optimizing Your Social Media Profiles training and for the ebook, pop your email address into the form below. I’ll send you instructions to access my resource library to download the free ebook.

Once you’re in the library, navigate to the social media section and download the ebook called “Social Media Optimization.”

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Facebook Groups tips for survival

While a Facebook Page’s success is tied to the number of likes and reach, a Facebook Group can be considered successful even if it’s small.

A group’s engagement and activity is what matters. For some freelancers, creating and moderating a Facebook group make sense but for many others, joining groups is enough.

We’re focusing on how to behave in other people’s groups today since that’s where the majority of freelance writers exist. So here we go.

When joining other people’s groups, here are a few things to keep in mind

  • Remember, this isn’t your group so don’t act like it is (if you don’t like it, create your own)
  • Pay attention to the group’s rules and abide by them. If the group rules say don’t share anything from the group then really don’t share anything. If the rules say don’t promote yourself then really don’t drop links and brag your bylines. Respect the group rules
  • Be kind, genuine and helpful—listen before you speak, if you have a negative emotional reaction to a topic or post don’t respond right away (avoid becoming an Internet troll!)
  • Make connections, yes. But don’t immediately try and sell something (that’s not how this works). Make sure you’re in these groups for the right reasons or this won’t be a positive experience for you
  • Watch for ways you can contribute to the group, don’t just take. Maybe you can’t participate in every discussion but if there is a question or topic you know something about, add a tip or two

While these general Facebook Group tips will keep you in good standing my biggest tip is this. Try and add value to the group rather than dissension.

There are so many times I see a beautiful group get sidelined by a disagreement where the moderator doesn’t step in soon enough and the discussion gets out of hand.

When groups go down this route it stops being safe and people become afraid to voice their opinion, lest they get trolled or jumped on.

Facebook Group tips

If you see this happening in one of your groups there are a few things you can do.

  • Avoid the drama. Consider muting the thread or group for a few days until the storm blows over
  • There is a chance the group moderator hasn’t seen the drama unfolding so if you think this is the case tag the person in the thread to draw their attention to it
  • Maybe the group is heading down this new, more volatile direction. If it stops feeling like a safe space to you or you feel like it’s just attracting distracting, unhealthy drama then consider leaving the group
  • As much as you can, avoid joining in the debate. In my experience, good doesn’t seem to come from emotional social media back-and-forths

For those looking for community, Facebook Groups can be an excellent option.

When searching for new groups to join, ask your friends and colleagues what groups they recommend first.

If you do a general search, keep in mind private groups will more often be safer than public groups.

This is because anyone can join a public group but you have to be approved to join a private group.

Look for groups that mirror your interests, or are moderated by people you admire. And if you do join a group and it’s not a good fit, don’t feel bad leaving.

Streamline your group experience and only stay in the groups you know you’ll be active in.

You May Also Like

These Facebook Group tips will help you network without going down the drama rabbit hole. Why would you want to participate in groups? They're an interesting ecosystem within the social media behemoth. For example, many successful Facebook Groups provide small, safe spaces for likeminded individuals to connect. And many groups have the added benefit of being secret or private, so your group activities aren't revealed to your friends or followers.

One more thing. I think you’ll enjoy my free resource library. This is where I keep my files, downloads, ebooks, worksheets and whatever else I manage to create. I love sharing what I learn and want to keep adding to this library so it becomes a wealth of helpful goodness.

This is a free resource but I do require a password to access the library itself. You can get access by popping your email address into the form below.

Get Access to My Free Resource Library

* indicates required
These Facebook Group tips will help you network without going down the drama rabbit hole. Why would you want to participate in groups? They're an interesting ecosystem within the social media behemoth. For example, many successful Facebook Groups provide small, safe spaces for likeminded individuals to connect. And many groups have the added benefit of being secret or private, so your group activities aren't revealed to your friends or followers.
These Facebook Group tips will help you network without going down the drama rabbit hole. Why would you want to participate in groups? They're an interesting ecosystem within the social media behemoth. For example, many successful Facebook Groups provide small, safe spaces for likeminded individuals to connect. And many groups have the added benefit of being secret or private, so your group activities aren't revealed to your friends or followers.